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Perhaps this is actually a bug, but for lack of finding anything suggesting it's known, I'll assume I'm doing something wrong.

I have a model, Study, with a datetime field as well as a foreign key to an object describing priority (basically a name/number pair, such that one can sort by number and view by name).

I'd like to sort Study objects first by priority (thus grouping them higher priority first), then by datetime, oldest first. In this way, Stat will be at the top of the list, with oldest first, etc.

Using my test DB, which is sqlite, this works just as anticipated:

ordered = ordered = models.Study.objects.all().order_by('arrived').order_by('-priority__priority')
for study in ordered:
    print(study.arrived, study.priority)

(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 22, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: STAT>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 20, 51, 948639, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 21, 6, 674582, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 21, 21, 86984, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 21, 36, 234965, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 21, 59, 618850, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 22, 18, 991499, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 22, 26, 229715, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 22, 31, 150896, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 22, 35, 379259, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 22, 43, 207465, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 15, 23, 31, 42, 176697, tzinfo=<UTC>), None)

On the other hand, using a production DB (postgres), things... go wrong:

ordered = models.Study.objects.all().order_by('arrived').order_by('-priority__priority')
for study in ordered:
    print(study.arrived, study.priority)

(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 31, 45, tzinfo=<UTC>), None)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 36, 15, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: STAT>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 36, 20, 520912, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 35, 18, 784721, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 35, 44, 540762, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 35, 51, 355645, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 35, 56, 800284, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 36, 2, 190325, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 36, 15, 137803, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 31, 44, 759514, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 37, 52, 264583, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 37, 54, 191852, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 37, 56, 385968, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 37, 57, 865427, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 38, 1, 959433, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 38, 4, 748306, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 36, 57, 562198, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)
(datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 29, 22, 34, 37, 909631, tzinfo=<UTC>), <StudyPriority: LOW>)

The most obvious annoyance is that for whatever reason, postgres chooses "null" objects first in this order. 'priority__priority' is the numerical priority value, highest = highest (so in this case, null is treated as infinity whereas in sqlite it's treated as -infinity). That's not a huge problem, easy enough to implement an annoying workaround to manually move those to the bottom.

The real problem is that the datetimes don't seem to be sorted! Within the "low" priority objects, the times are all over the map.

Is this likely some kind of bug in the ORM, or am I doing something identifiably wrong that happens to not be an issue with sqlite?

share|improve this question
2  
I don't think you need the two order_by() statements, they can be combined: ordered = models.Study.objects.all().order_by('arrived', '-priority__priority') –  monkut May 30 '13 at 22:42
1  
you dont need the all() either –  karthikr May 30 '13 at 22:51
    
@monkut, submit that as an answer! I would speculate that the reason it seems to be working on the test data is because the test data happens to have been inserted so that datetime ordering matches id ordering, which is the default in cases where ordering is ambiguous. –  Andrew Gorcester May 30 '13 at 22:52
1  
As an aside, the "null" thing is indeed a difference in implementation between the two database engines. –  Andrew Gorcester May 30 '13 at 22:53
    
thxs, had it as an answer, but wasn't sure it would resolve the issue, so I moved it to a comment. Added it back. –  monkut May 30 '13 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you want to do this:

ordered = models.Study.objects.order_by('arrived', '-priority__priority')

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/querysets/#order-by

share|improve this answer
    
Weird, in theory one should be able to chain order_bys, but you're absolutely right that this works whereas the chained separated version doesn't. I am still a bit curious as to the inner workings of why, I don't think I understand the queryset to SQL translation. To be totally specific, the absolutely correct version is ordered = models.Study.objects.order_by('-priority__priority', 'arrived') - priority should be the most prominent sort option, then within each priority they should be sorted by arrival. –  Alex Whittemore May 31 '13 at 22:31

monokut's answer about how to properly chain order_by is part of the equation, the other part is making priority__priority NOT NULL.

You are trying to sort on a NULLable field -- which is always an implementation-specific monkeywrench. Above you try to reason out why NULL is first or last. Its collation is arbitrary between databases not because it "equals infinity" but because it isn't equal to anything, even itself. (Incidentally, in Postgres if you issued a raw() query you could specify NULLS LAST or NULLS FIRST to get what you want, but Django doesn't provide an ORM shortcut to this.)

If you need to sort on a column the reliable way is to make the field NOT NULL and give it a default value that explicitly means "undefined" or "last place" and make the collation for that value before/after every other value so that it becomes sortable in a predictable way. In deeper geek terms this is a domain/typing problem and you are trying to sort a None type in a domain that doesn't include it as a member instead of on an explicit "bottom" value.

In your example I would make a new priority type called "LOWEST", set it as the default on the model field, and set priority__priority to 1000 or 0, depending on what "LOWEST" should mean relative to "LOW". Then replace every case of NULL with LOWEST, and update the priority field to be not null. Then your sorting will work as expected in every system. (And you won't be open to universal SQL irritations/surprises like NULL-propagation expression nuking.)

share|improve this answer
    
This is very succinct and helpful, thanks! Unfortunately I can't select 'answered' for both. The bit about NULLS LAST or NULLS FIRST is interesting, although I agree with you that the best solution is to simply make a "none" priority and default it. That does raise a secondary question: if I try to assign "null" to a non-nullable foreign key with a default, will it use the default automatically, or throw an exception? i.e. if a component returns a null priority, do I need to translate that to the 'none' priority even with a default set? –  Alex Whittemore May 31 '13 at 22:40
    
Explicit NULLs are rejected on insert or update if the column is marked NOT NULL, whether or not a default value is set. So you need to insert "default" as the value, not "null". In Django this is what setting the default="foo" keyword argument is for. So on your model priority = models.CharField(null=False, default='LOWEST') or whatever is what you need. Then if you just omit priority from the object.create() list you will get the default value. –  zxq9 May 31 '13 at 23:07
    
Oh I see what you're saying. Unfortunately that means I need to change some other logic anyway, so I may as well just throw an if not discovered_priority_from_other_module: get the default priority. Which is just as well, South seems to have some weird problems with the workarounds required for foreign_key defaults. –  Alex Whittemore May 31 '13 at 23:19
    
Part of why I don't use South -- or any ORMish tools on non-trivial schemas. On the subject of default values and NULL handling, I wrote a complete example of a non-NULL heirarchy schema and lineage view here. Unfortunately SQL makes this more complicated than it needs to be -- the main point to NULL handling is to realize that a value that means "None" or "Greater than everything" or "Lower than everything" needs to be included in the domain of acceptable values to avoid sabotaging your logic by mixing those meanings with "unknown". –  zxq9 Jun 2 '13 at 8:15
    
I'm not really sure why that qualifies as a reason not to use South, though. True, south can't handle a situation that complicated, but then it'll just tell you and you'll have to write your own migration SQL. Still easier to do within the framework of south than totally rolling your own. –  Alex Whittemore Jun 3 '13 at 16:28

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