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The situation I have is that I am trying to initialize a file scoped variable, std::string, in a shared object constructor. It will probably be more clear in code:

#include <string>
#include <dlfcn.h>
#include <cstring>
static std::string pathToDaemon; // daemon should always be in the same dir as my *.so
__attribute__((constructor))
static void SetPath()
{
    int lastSlash(0):
    Dl_info dl_info;
    memset(&dl_info, 0, sizeof(dl_info));

    if((dladdr((void*)SetPath, &dl_info)) == 0)
        throw up;

    pathToDaemon = dl_info.dli_fname; // **whoops, segfault here**
    lastSlash = pathToDaemon.find_last_of('/');
    if(std::string::npos == lastSlash)
    {
        // no slash, but in this dir
        pathToDaemon = "progd";
    }
    else
    {
        pathToDaemon.erase(pathToDaemon.begin() + (lastSlash+1), pathToDaemon.end());
        pathToDaemon.append("progd");
    }

    std::cout << "DEBUG: path to daemon is: " << pathToDaemon << std::endl;
}

I have a very simple program that does this same thing: a test driver program for concept if you will. The code in that looks just like this: a "shared object ctor" which uses dladdr() to store off the path of the *.so file when the file is loaded.

Modifications I've tried:

namespace {
    std::string pathToDaemon;
    __attribute__((constructor))
    void SetPath() {
        // function def
    }
}

or

static std::string pathToDaemon;
__attribute__((constructor))
void SetPath() { // this function not static
    // function def
}

and

std::string pathToDaemon; // variable not static
__attribute__((constructor))
void SetPath() { // this function not static
    // function def
}

The example you see above sits in a file that is compiled into both a static object library and a DLL. The compilation process:

  • options for static.a: --std=C++0x -c -Os.
  • options for shared.so: -Wl,--whole-archive /path/to/static.a -Wl,--no-whole-archive -lz -lrt -ldl -Wl,-Bstatic -lboost_python -lboost_thread -lboost_regex -lboost_system -Wl,-Bdynamic -fPIC -shared -o mymodule.so [a plethora of more objects which wrap into python the static stuff]

The hoops I have to jump through in the bigger project make a much more complicated build process than my little test driver program requires. This makes me think that the problem lies there. Can anyone please shed some light on what I'm missing?

Thanks, Andy

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Have you narrowed down whether the segfault occurs because of assigning anything to pathToDaemon at that point, or specifically because of assigning dl_info.dli_fname? Probably worth looking at what the value of dl_info.dli_fname is. –  Markku K. May 30 '13 at 23:12
    
throw up; - made me laugh. Have you run under gdb and broken on the indicated line? does it appear to be a valid pointer? –  Nathan Ernst May 31 '13 at 3:00
    
@markkuk. I have attempted to assign an empty string to the std::string variable: it segfaults. I have not yet attempted the gdb option. I will spend some time on that one now. I was suspecting that it wasn't a valid pointer but I just don't understand why. It's a "global". Shouldn't it exist? –  Andrew Falanga May 31 '13 at 14:17
    
I'm glad that I had this listed in the compiler options above. However, I've narrowed down the problem to optimization done by the compiler (which explains why my little test driver program didn't exhibit the problem). I'm running through various permutations now that I can find. I'm considering redoing the question to better reflect the problem. Can anyone advise me about the "netiquette" for that here on Stack Overflow? –  Andrew Falanga May 31 '13 at 16:24
    
I would suggest that, if the new question is substantially different, just delete this one and ask a new one. –  Markku K. May 31 '13 at 18:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think it's worth giving the answer that I've found. The problem was due to the complex nature of the shared library loading. I discovered after some digging that I could reproduce the problem in my test bed program when compiling the code with optimizations enabled. That confirmed the hypothesis that the variable truly didn't exist when it was being accessed by the constructor function.

GCC includes some extra tools for C++ which allow for developers to force certain things to happen at particular times during code initialization. More precisely, it allows for certain things to take place in particular order rather than particular times.

For example:

int someVar(55) __attribute__((init_priority(101)));

// This function is a lower priority than the initialization above
// so, this will happen *after*
__attribute__((constructor(102)))
void SomeFunc() {
    // do important stuff
    if(someVar == 55) {
        // do something here that important too
        someVar = 44;
    }
}

I was able to use these tools to success in the test bed program even with optimizations enabled. The happiness which ensued was short lived when applied to my much larger library. Ultimately, the problem was due to the nature of such a large amount of code and the problematic way in which the variables are brought into existence. It just wasn't reliable to use these mechanisms.

Since I wanted to avoid repeated calls for evaluating the path, i.e.

std::string GetPath() {
    Dl_info dl_info;
    dladdr((void*)GetPath, &dl_info);
    // do wonderful stuff to find the path
    return dl_info.dli_fname;
}

The solution turned out to be much simpler than I was trying to make it:

namespace {
    std::string PathToProgram() {
        Dl_info dl_info;
        dladdr((void*)PathToProgram, &dl_info);
        std::string pathVar(dl_info.dli_fname);

        // do amazing things to find the last slash and remove the shared object
        // from that path and append the name of the external daemon
        return pathVar;
    }

    std::string DaemonPath() {
        // I'd forgotten that static variables, like this, are initialized
        // only once due to compiler magic.
        static const std::string pathToDaemon(PathToProgram());
        return pathToDaemon;
    }
}

As you can see, exactly what I wanted with less confusion. Everything happens only once, except calls to DaemonPath(), and everything remains within the translation unit.

I hope this helps someone who runs into this in the future.

Andy

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Maybe you could try running valgrind on your program

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In you self posted solution above, you have changed your »interface« (for the code that reads your pathToDaemon / DaemonPath()) from »Accessing a file scoped variable« to »calling a function in anonymous namespace« - so far ok.

But the implementation of DaemonPath() is not done in a thread-safe way. I though that thread-safeness matters, because your are wrote »-lboost_thread« in your question. So you may think about to change the implementation thread-safe. There are many discussions and solutions about singleton pattern and thread-safeness available, e.g.:

The fact is, that your DaemonPath() will invoked (maybe far) after loading of the library is done. Note, that only the 1st call to the singleton pattern is critical in a multithreaded environment.

As an alternative, you may add a simple »early« call to your DaemonPath() function like this:

namespace {
    std::string PathToProgram() {
        ... your code from above ...
    }

    std::string DaemonPath() {
        ... your code from above ...
    }

    __attribute__((constructor)) void MyPathInit() {
        DaemonPath();
    }
}

or in a more portable way like this:

namespace {
    std::string PathToProgram() {
        ... your code from above ...
    }

    std::string DaemonPath() {
        ... your code from above ...
    }

    class MyPathInit {
    public:
        MyPathInit() {
            DaemonPath();
        }
    } myPathInit;
}

Of course, this approach don't makes your singleton pattern thread-safe. But sometimes, there are situations, we can be sure that there are no concurrent thread accesses (e.g. at initialization time when the shared lib is loading). If this conditions matches for you, this approach could be a way to bypass thread-safeness problem without the use of thread locking (mutex...).

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