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I have a Python 3 question. How do I automatically get the returncode from a Popen object after the child process terminates?

In short, I need an application to wait, but not be unresponsive (if possible), until the child process ends, and then automatically call a function based on the returncode.

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Are you using a GUI framework? If so, which one? –  Winston Ewert May 30 '13 at 23:04
    
Actually, I'm not entirely sure how to answer that, since what I'm doing is writing a script for Blender (a 3D modeling application). May I ask why you're asking? :D –  swingsoneto May 31 '13 at 1:28
    
In a GUI, to stay responsive you need to keep processing incoming events (mouse clicks, etc), and the way to do that depends on your GUI. –  Winston Ewert May 31 '13 at 2:19
    
A quick look at blender's documentation suggests there isn't a way to have a long running task while remaining responsive. So if it isn't responsive enough with @Ryan's solution, then you're stuck with it. –  Winston Ewert May 31 '13 at 2:23

1 Answer 1

The following "might" be what you're looking for, but it's possible I don't quite understand what you want.

import subprocess
child = subprocess.Popen(do_something_here)
streamdata = child.communicate()[0]
rc = child.returncode

You can find more information about this here:

http://docs.python.org/2/library/subprocess.html#subprocess.Popen.returncode

If I misunderstood your question, please let me know and I'll try and help you more with this.

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I think you mean child.returncode instead of return.code. –  SethMMorton May 30 '13 at 23:25
    
Huh. Yep, that works. I don't completely understand WHY, though. By calling communicate(), it waits for the process to end before assigning child.returncode? –  swingsoneto May 31 '13 at 1:42
    
@swingsoneto, that's exactly what happens. communicate() waits for the process to exit before returning. –  Winston Ewert May 31 '13 at 2:22
    
@SethMMorton - yes, my apologies. I've fixed the typo. –  Ruby is Chai May 31 '13 at 5:03
    
Thanks for the help, everyone. –  swingsoneto Jun 4 '13 at 5:14

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