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I have this code:

class Note < Struct.new :value
  def to_s
    value.to_s
  end
  def self.use_new(arg)
    Note.new arg
  end
end

class Chord
  def initialize(arr)
    @arr = arr
  end

  def play
    @arr.join('-')
  end
end
new_method = Note.singleton_method(:use_new)
chords = %w{ G Bb Dd E }
c = Chord.new(chords.map(:new_method))
puts c.play

Now I know I don't have to do this with map, I can simply use map {|n| Note.new n}

But I want to know how to do this. The following says Note doesn't have a method called singleton_method. When I try and use instance method (without the self in the definition) it says the method doesn't exist. Please advise.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why do you want an UnboundMethod? There's not much you can sensibly do with an UnboundMethod. In particular, you cannot call it. The only thing you can do is bind it to an instance of the module you got it from in order to obtain a bound Method. In this case, however, the module in question is Note's singleton class which has only one instance anyway, so you can only bind it to Note. So, you might just as well get a bound Method in the first place:

new_method = Note.method(:use_new)
chords = %w{ G Bb Dd E }
c = Chord.new(chords.map(&new_method)) # BTW: you had a typo here
puts c.play

I also don't understand what the purpose of your Note::use_new is. It is simply a no-op wrapper around Note::new, so it might just as well be an alias_method instead. Or, even better, just remove it, it doesn't server any purpose:

new_method = Note.method(:new)
chords = %w{ G Bb Dd E }
c = Chord.new(chords.map(&new_method)) # BTW: you had a typo here
puts c.play

You can use singleton_method as well, if you want to make sure to only get singleton methods:

new_method = Note.singleton_method(:use_new)
chords = %w{ G Bb Dd E }
c = Chord.new(chords.map(&new_method)) # BTW: you had a typo here
puts c.play

If you really insist on getting an UnboundMethod, then you will have to bind it first, before you can use it, and you have to get it from the singleton class, since singleton_method returns a Method not an UnboundMethod:

new_method = Note.singleton_class.instance_method(:use_new)
chords = %w{ G Bb Dd E }
c = Chord.new(chords.map(&new_method.bind(Note)))
puts c.play
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I didn't really understand how to do this. I tried to grab new, but thought it was "ungrabbable" so I defined a method to grab it for me. I didn't know we could use #method on a class. I thought it always had to be instance_method or singleton_method. When I first tried to use singleton_method it said that function was undefined for class Note. I've been trying to understand this kind of thing for a long time now. Why do I have to use & in map? I thought & was the equivilant of calling method.to_proc, can't I just pass the method? How do I know what .to_proc yields? –  Senjai May 31 '13 at 0:55
    
I don't suppose you'd have time to confirm this as well would you? stackoverflow.com/questions/16824244/… Thanks for all your help Jorg. –  Senjai May 31 '13 at 0:55

Try this:

new_method = (class << Note; self; end).instance_method(:use_new)

This fixes the main problem, though there are still some others.

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Ahh, this is the workaround to get the self for the singleton class right? Is this really the only way to do this properly? –  Senjai May 31 '13 at 0:24
    
@Senjai: Pretty much, yeah. –  Linuxios May 31 '13 at 0:27
    
Actually this doesnt work. i've tried playing around with it. Put it wont work in map –  Senjai May 31 '13 at 0:49
    
@Senjai: it answers your question though it doesn't fix the code. –  Linuxios May 31 '13 at 1:22

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