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MySQL 5.5.28. I have two tables Person and Message and the latter has a foreign key to the former. Each table has id as the primary key column, and the Person table also has a column personId which is (uniquely) indexed.

The query below should take advantage of the personId key index, but instead MySQL requires scanning the entire Message table for some reason:

mysql> EXPLAIN SELECT `m`.*
    -> FROM
    ->   `Message` AS `m`
    -> LEFT JOIN
    ->   `Person` AS `p` ON (`m`.`person` = `p`.`id`)
    -> WHERE
    ->   'M002649397' IS NULL OR
    ->   `p`.`personId` = 'M002649397';
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+----------------+--------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref            | rows   | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+----------------+--------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | m     | ALL    | NULL          | NULL    | NULL    | NULL           | 273220 |             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 8       | pcom.m.person  |      1 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+----------------+--------+-------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

But when I comment out the 'M002649397' IS NULL OR clause (which has no effect on the result), the query suddenly gets more efficient:

mysql> EXPLAIN SELECT `m`.*
    -> FROM
    ->   `Message` AS `m`
    -> LEFT JOIN
    ->   `Person` AS `p` ON (`m`.`person` = `p`.`id`)
    -> WHERE
    -> --  'M002649397' IS NULL OR
    ->   `p`.`personId` = 'M002649397';
+----+-------------+-------+-------+--------------------+--------------------+---------+-------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys      | key                | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+--------------------+--------------------+---------+-------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | const | PRIMARY,personId   | personId           | 767     | const |    1 | Using index |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | m     | ref   | FK9C2397E7A0F6ED11 | FK9C2397E7A0F6ED11 | 9       | const |    3 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+--------------------+--------------------+---------+-------+------+-------------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

My question is: why isn't MySQL smart enough to realize that 'M002649397' IS NULL is always false, optimize it away, and save having to needlessly scan every row in a huge table?

In other words, does the MySQL optimizer not know that 'M002649397' IS NULL is always false, or is it failing to apply that optimization to the query when constructing its query plan?

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps the query planner wasn't designed that way because they expected developers not to write queries that we can easily optimize manually? It does seem a little silly to even have that condition in the query. A better question might be, "Why do I want this in my query? Can I find a better way of generating the query?" If you're generating the query code side, then you should have the ability to leave out the condition. –  jpmc26 May 31 '13 at 0:58
    
    
@jpmc26: Actualy their optimizer is designed to perform such optimizations dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/where-optimizations.html –  zerkms May 31 '13 at 1:07
1  
What happens if you change the where clause to WHERE 0 or `p`.`personId` = 'M002649397' –  Barmar May 31 '13 at 1:10
1  
I wonder is it the same result if IS NULL is replaced by any other constant expression. –  raina77ow May 31 '13 at 1:13

2 Answers 2

Actually, what is more interesting, is that the documentation says that MySQL is smart enough to do this (see here).

This would seem to come under the heading "8.2.1.2. Eliminating “Dead” Code".

I suppose the reason is that the developers did not consider an expression such as " is not null" when the code was written. The documentation gives many examples based on constant propagation (x1 = 2 and x2 = x1 becomes x1 = 2 and x2 = 2). is null probably does arise in this situation.

share|improve this answer
    
He mentioned that 0 or personid = 'xxx' also isn't optimized, so it has nothing to do with optimizing is not null. It sounds like they don't optimize 0 or <expression> into <expression>. –  Barmar May 31 '13 at 2:51
1  
@Barmar . . . (Hi Barmar, I think we used to work together.) This is not the first time that I've found MySQL documentation more optimistic than the MySQL implementation. –  Gordon Linoff May 31 '13 at 2:56
    
"MySQL documentation more optimistic than the MySQL implementation" --- Documentation Driven Development: you declare more features than you have and implement it as soon as people actually point to a bug –  zerkms May 31 '13 at 3:05
    
@zerkms . . . After I wrote that comment, I realized it would probably come across as too negative. The only other case I've experienced this is with index optimization of aggregations. group by just does not seem to use indexes in practice, but the do according to the documentation. Overall, I'm impressed with the documentation . . . and this is straying from the OP. –  Gordon Linoff May 31 '13 at 3:12
1  
(Yes, at TMC). Pretty depressing -- optimizing identities when simplifying expressions is a CS 101 exercise, and any decent compiler should do it. –  Barmar May 31 '13 at 3:15

This is a verified MySQL bug.

You can not have one execution plan for the condition:

WHERE (0 = 1) OR p.personId = 'string_constant';

and another execution plan for:

WHERE p.personId = 'string_constant';

because (0 = 1) always results in FALSE, which makes the above two queries 100 % identical.

You can see in the bug report itself that execution plan when (0 = 1) OR is present is much worse then the one where the expression is only the equality of a column to a constant.

*Note this is fixed in MariaDB.

share|improve this answer
    
OP already know that....Just look carefully at the bug report....it's from him :) –  Fabien TheSolution Sep 12 '13 at 1:25

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