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How can I extract pieces from this string?

I have a file that contains:

0065445 APPLE$456
089464 MANGO$489
0012389 GUAVA$744

What I want to do is input the file line by line, then cut the string into some pieces.

  • 0065455 Will go in a struct a[0].num
  • APPLE will go in struct a[0].name
  • 456 will go in struct a[0].dollar

And similarly for other lines.

Everything is working fine, but it's not successfully getting the dollar part into its variable.

Here's the code:

#include<cstdlib>
#include<iostream>

using namespace std ;

int main(){

FILE *fp;

fp = fopen("input.txt","r");

char str[80] ;

struct abc{
int num;
char name[20];
int dollar;
};

int i = 0;

while(fgets(str,79,fp)!=NULL){

struct abc a[i] ;

sscanf(str,"%d %[^$]s$%d\n",&a[i].num,a[i].name,&a[i].dollar);

cout <<i+1 <<") Number : "<<a[i].num<<" Name :  "<< a[i].name <<" Dollar : "<< a[i].dollar << endl ;
i++;

}

return 0 ;
}
/* These didn't work too.
sscanf(str,"%d %[^$]s %d\n",&a[i].num,a[i].name,&a[i].dollar);
sscanf(str,"%d %[^$]s%d\n",&a[i].num,a[i].name,&a[i].dollar);
sscanf(str,"%d %s$%d\n",&a[i].num,a[i].name,&a[i].dollar);

*/

There's 1 more problem: the first part of string is an int that starts with 0, but the zero is not being accepted in the int. How to do it?

This is working as I want now but still after parasing the string into an int I am not getting the zeroes:

#include<cstdlib>
#include<iostream>
#include<cstring>

using namespace std ;

int main(){

    FILE *fp;

    fp = fopen("input.txt","r");

    char str[80] ;
    char temp[80] ;
    struct abc{
        int num;
        char name[20];
        int dollar;
    };

    int i = 0;
    int j = 0 ;

    while(fgets(str,79,fp)!=NULL){
        i = 0;
        j = 0 ;
        struct abc a[i] ;

        char* ptr = 0; // this is used as a helper variable to strtok

        ptr = strtok(str, " $\n"); // we specify the delimiters here

        while (ptr != NULL) 
        {
            if (j == 0){
                strcpy(temp, ptr);
                a[i].num = atoi(temp);
            }
            if (j == 1)
                strcpy(a[i].name, ptr);

            if (j == 2){
                strcpy(temp, ptr);
                a[i].dollar = atoi(temp);
            }

            ptr = strtok(NULL, " $\n");
            j++;
        }

        cout <<i+1 <<") Number : "<<a[i].num<<" Name :  "<< a[i].name <<" Dollar : "<< a[i].dollar << endl ;
        i++;
    }

    return 0 ;
}

/* These didn't work either.
sscanf(str,"%d %[^$]s %d\n",&a[i].num,a[i].name,&a[i].dollar);
sscanf(str,"%d %[^$]s%d\n",&a[i].num,a[i].name,&a[i].dollar);
sscanf(str,"%d %s$%d\n",&a[i].num,a[i].name,&a[i].dollar);

*/
share|improve this question
    
Do you mean 0065455 will go in a struct a[0].num? (as opposed to a[0].int) – A.E. Drew May 31 '13 at 4:16
    
sscanf "stops scanning" when it gets a hit on the [^$]. You need a second sscanf that starts where you left off (number of characters read is returned by sscanf), then read the value after the $ sign. – Floris May 31 '13 at 4:18
    
He wants to extract the string in three pieces, the logic is he should find first space, second $ from 0065445 APPLE$456 , and he will get the 0065445, APPLE and 456 – vikas May 31 '13 at 4:18
    
Yes sorry correcting – UmeRonaldo May 31 '13 at 4:18
    
I was not provided with space it was a question in a contest – UmeRonaldo May 31 '13 at 4:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

the 0's will not show up when you print the integer a[i].num.

You could make a[i].num a string (char[]) or an integer array. to make the 0's show up. you can parse it as an integer (via atoi(str)), if you need it to be used otherwsie.

share|improve this answer
    
OK the 0's will remain in there after parase ? – UmeRonaldo May 31 '13 at 4:22
    
well, you could loop through the string until you find the first non-zero, then parse starting there. – a_schimpf May 31 '13 at 4:24
    
use atoi(str) to convert string to integer. cplusplus.com/reference/cstdlib/atoi – a_schimpf May 31 '13 at 4:26
    
I did but the 0's are still not getting in the int. are you saying that I should use the string for the zeroes. – UmeRonaldo May 31 '13 at 4:33
    
yes, use a string because it will store any kind of char (including 0-9). then when you print the string, it will include the 0s. then, if you ever need to actually treat a[i].num as an integer, you can use atoi(str) starting at the first non-zero. – a_schimpf May 31 '13 at 4:36

Based on the C++ tag, I'd do things a little differently. First I'd overload the stream extractor operator for your abc type:

std::istream &operator>>(std::istream &is, abc &a) { 
    is >> a.num;
    std::getline(is, a.name, '$');
    return is >> a.dollar;
}

Then you can use that to read in a file of records, such as:

abc temp;

std::vector<abc> a;

std::ifstream in("input.txt");

while (in >> temp)
    a.push_back(temp);

Or, you can use an istream_iterator to initialize a vector directly from the stream:

std::vector<abc> a((std::istream_iterator<abc>(in)),
                    std::istream_iterator<abc>());

The easiest way to keep the leading zeros on the first number is probably to change it from an int to a std::string.

share|improve this answer
    
Gota learn alot before using this but Thanks – UmeRonaldo May 31 '13 at 4:34

Use strtok:

Here is a simple code (C only) that prints your strings separately (I recommended a similar solution in another post).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h> // for strcpy and strtok
#include <stdlib.h> // for atoi
int main()
{
    char input [25] = "0065445 APPLE$4056"; // input string

    // storage for the separate parts of the string
    char line[10]; 
    char fruit[10];
    char number[10];

    char* ptr = 0; // this is used as a helper variable to strtok

    ptr = strtok(input, " $\n"); // we specify the delimiters here
    int i = 0;
    // I'm using i here as a control variable so that during each iteration different part
    // of the string is saved
    while (ptr != NULL) 
    {
        if (i == 0)
            strcpy(line, ptr);

        if (i == 1)
            strcpy(fruit, ptr);

        if (i == 2)
            strcpy(number, ptr);

        ptr = strtok(NULL, " $\n");
        i++;      
    }

    printf("%s %s %s\n", line, fruit, number);

    return 0;
}

Some sample output:

$ ./a.out 
0065445 APPLE 4056

Is this what you need?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes thank you ! I tried strtok in my contest but I did't rememberd it correctly . Thank you buddy – UmeRonaldo May 31 '13 at 4:26
    
But is it bad to use in c++ too – UmeRonaldo May 31 '13 at 4:26
    
Well, C++ is a very different language from C, best to stick to C++ way of doing things for something like this if you can write it in C++. – Nobilis May 31 '13 at 4:29
    
bro I took the 0065445 in a string then used atoi to get it into int but still the starting 0's are'nt getting stored in the int – UmeRonaldo May 31 '13 at 4:32
    
Oh, sorry I've misunderstood you, I thought you wanted to strip them, will update the question. It will need to be in a string in this case. – Nobilis May 31 '13 at 4:34
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
struct abc{ int num; std::string name; int dollar; };
int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    std::ifstream file("input");
    abc st1;
    std::string l;
    while (file >> st1.num >> l) {
        if (size_t p = l.find_first_of('$')) {
            st1.name = l.substr(0, p);
            std::istringstream(l.substr(p+1)) >> st1.dollar;
            std::cout << st1.num << " : "
                << st1.name << " : " << st1.dollar << std::endl;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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