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Suppose, I have 2 cases one is for sms and another for mail. I need to send a message in both cases. Now, for sending sms I use the following xml.

my $addxml="<tolist><to>";
$addxml=$addxml."<name>".$name."</name>";
$addxml=$addxml."<contactpersonname>".$name."</contactpersonname>";
$addxml=$addxml."<number>".$number."</number>";
$addxml=$addxml."</tolist></to>"

Now, for sending the email, I will be using the same xml except that instead of number I use email tag.

my $addxml="<tolist><to>";
$addxml=$addxml."<name>".$name."</name>";
$addxml=$addxml."<contactpersonname>".$name."</contactpersonname>";
$addxml=$addxml."<email>".$email."</email>";
$addxml=$addxml."</tolist></to>"

How can I write a subroutine in perl that is going to use the above xml once but change the tags (number and email) whenever necessary for sms or email.

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2 Answers 2

use strict;
use warnings;

sub sendout {
  my ($type, $name, $addr) = (shift, shift, shift);
my $addxml =<<EID;
<tolist><to>
  <name>NAME</name>
  <contactpersonname>NAME</contactpersonname>
  <ADDR>@</ADDR> 
</tolist></to>
EID
  $addxml =~ s/NAME/$name/g;
  $addxml =~ s/@/$addr/g;
  $addxml =~ s/ADDR/number/g if ($type eq 'sms');
  $addxml =~ s/ADDR/email/g if ($type eq 'email');
  return $addxml;
}

print sendout('sms', "Fudo", "+1321123321"), "\n";
print sendout('email', "Fudo", "user\@fudo.com"), "\n";
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Answers the question, but it's really, really ugly. –  innaM May 31 '13 at 12:41

How about something like this:

my $sms_xml = xml_gen(
    name              => $name,
    contactpersonname => $contactpersonname,
    number            => $number,
);
my $mail_xml = xml_gen(
    name              => $name,
    contactpersonname => $contactpersonname,
    email             => $email,
);

sub xml_gen {
    my %params = @_;
    my $xml = qq{<tolist><to>};
    foreach my $key (keys %params) {
         $xml = qq{<$key>$params{$key}</$key>};
    }
    $xml .= qq{</to></tolist>};
    return $xml;
}

One advantage of this approach is that you can add as many fields to your XML as you wish.

If you want to completely abstract it away, you can create function like this:

sub xml_gen {
    my ($name, $number, $email) = @_;
    my $xml = qq{<tolist><to>}
            . qq{<name>$name</name>}
            . qq{<contactpersonname>$name</contactpersonname>;
    $xml .= qq{<number>$number</number>} if $number;
    $xml .= qq{<email>$email</email>}    if $email;
    $xml .= qq{</to></tolist>};
    return $xml;
}

Call it like:

xml_gen($name, $number, $email);

If $number or $email is undef, then it will be omitted from the output. This way you can set one, another or both.

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Thanks for the reply...but I need to take a condition to subroutine say if parameter to subroutine is 0 then it is sms, if it is 1 then email if it is 2 then both.How can I accomplish this –  Rudra May 31 '13 at 5:42
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1317530/…. Why do the work yourself? Use one of the XML modules on CPAN. –  Eric Jablow May 31 '13 at 5:44
    
@EricJablow: it would be true for generic case. However, I could see why creating custom routine might be very helpful in case like this. –  mvp May 31 '13 at 5:56
    
But, that shouldn't be one's first impulse. –  Eric Jablow May 31 '13 at 10:01
    
well, none of XML-related CPAN modules mentioned in question/answers you have linked is installed in Perl by default (even in most recent versions). If anything, I would happily write 5 line subroutine to generate XML manually if that means my code will not require installing any extra dependencies, and will run anywhere. –  mvp May 31 '13 at 10:08

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