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So I was fooling around with some C++ and got the previously stated error with some code that looked kind of like this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

char foodstuffs;

void fruit()
{
cin>>foodstuffs;
switch(foodstuffs)
{
case 'a': goto foo; break;
case 'b': goto fooo; break;
}
}

int main()
{
cout<<"What do you want to eat? (a/b)";
fruit();
foo: cout<<"You eat an apple.";
fooo: cout<<"You eat a banana.";
}

The exact code was much more complex, but this is just to show you the error I got.

Now I realize that everyone despises the "goto" statement for some reason, but my actual code is full of so many gotos that I don't really have the time/patience to go back and change them all. Also, I'm kind of a novice programmer and I find gotos and labels to be very easy to use.

My question is how can I predefine these labels so that the function fruit() knows what they are? Also, I need to do this without moving the labels out of the main function.

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2  
You find the gotos and labels easy to use, but extremely hard to go back and change. That, my friend, is why everyone hates them. –  chris May 31 '13 at 7:46
    
why goto? as chris said, everyone hates them ;) –  BillHoo May 31 '13 at 7:50
1  
The main point is, you've seen how they can make code hard to read, follow, understand, and maintain. There are a couple valid uses where goto arguably makes code cleaner, and I personally wouldn't penalize goto if the resulting code was cleaner, but it's definitely not something to be thrown in on a whim. –  chris May 31 '13 at 7:52
    
Perhaps the reason you like goto is that you haven't learned C++ yet. Look up the "return" keyword as your next lesson. BTW - you might want to fix the bug in your example where eating an apple also eats a banana. –  kfsone May 31 '13 at 7:54
2  
@UrameshiYusuke That's because you can't do that. You need to help yourself by learning not to use goto. –  molbdnilo May 31 '13 at 8:19

4 Answers 4

The goto statement can only go to locally defined labels, it's can't jump to other functions.

So the labels in main will not be referenced, and the goto statements in fruit will not find the labels.

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What can I use to jump to other functions then? –  Urameshi Yusuke May 31 '13 at 7:48
    
@UrameshiYusuke don't jump to other functions. Just return to the point of call. –  juanchopanza May 31 '13 at 7:50
1  
@UrameshiYusuke My advice is: don't! If you need to jump between functions your design is most likely flawed. Instead return from the function with a special value, then use if or switch on that returned value in the caller to do different things. Using goto can be useful in some very limited situations, but for most uses there are always other and better solutions. –  Joachim Pileborg May 31 '13 at 7:50

Sorry. You cannot goto to a label that is outside of the current executing function. Also, there are other limits on the uses of goto. For example, you cannot skip a variable definition using goto. And there are others that I am not fully aware of.

The bottom line?

Don't use goto.

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It's good in assembly, I think, and can be a nice similarity. –  JVE999 Jul 26 at 6:04

Yes, goto cant be used to navigate outside the current function. try returning something from the function and use that in if else condition.

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What you are trying to do - jump between functions - is not valid for a whole slew of reasons, not least being object scope and life time, consider:

void foo()
{
    if(feelLikeIt)
       goto foobar;
}

void bar()
{
    std::string message = "Hello";
foobar:
    cout << message << endl;
}

Jumping to foobar from foo is illegal because "message" won't exist.

So the language just plain doesn't let you do this.

Further, the way you are trying to use "goto" would prevent you from re-using the "fruit()" function because it always makes a decision about what to do with the selection rather than the function calling it. What if you wanted to do this:

cout<<"What do you want to eat? (a/b)";
fruit();
foo: cout<<"You eat an apple.";
fooo: cout<<"You eat a banana.";
cout<<"What does your friend want to eat? (a/b)";
fruit();
// oops, you just created a loop because fruit made the decision on what to do next.

What you ACTUALLY want to do is use "fruit()" as a function that returns a value.

enum Fruit { NoSuchFruit, Apple, Banana };

Fruit fruit(const char* request)
{
    char foodstuffs;
    cout << request << " (a/b)";
    cin >> foodstuffs;
    switch (foodstuffs)
    {
        case 'a': return Apple;
        case 'b': return Banana;
        default:
            cout << "Don't recognize that fruit (" << foodstuffs << ")." << endl;
            return NoSuchFruit;
    }
}

const char* fruitNames[] = { "nothing", "an apple" ,"a banana" };

int main()
{
    Fruit eaten = fruit("What do you want to eat?");
    cout << "You ate " << fruitNames[eaten] << "." << endl;
    eaten = fruit("What does your friend want to eat?");
    cout << "Your friend ate " << fruitNames[eaten] << "." << endl;
}
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