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I have a very simple shared data structure with only one class, the idea being that every thread first aquire the mutex before doing an update:

class SharedData {
private:
    int * score;
    int n_loc;

public:
    mutex mutex;
    SharedData(int n_loc) : n_loc(n_loc) {
        score = new int[n_loc];
    }
    ~SharedData() {
        delete [] score;
    }
    void update_score(int * score2) {
        for(uint i = 0; i < n_loc; ++i) {
            score[i] = score2[i] = max(score[i], score2[i]);
        }
    }
};

Would it be ok for the class to handle it's own mutex, for example

void update_score_safe(int * score2, bool force_update = false) {
    if(force_update) mutex.lock();
    else if(!mutex.try_lock()) return;

    update_score(score2);

    mutex.unlock();
}

Is this this piece of code now thread safe? Will it prevent any code from calling the class without locking (given that I would make the mutex and the real update method private)?

share|improve this question
    
If you're using std::mutex, then you might as well use std::lock_guard. –  Mark Garcia May 31 '13 at 8:10
    
1) Can't see any problem in this. And... yes, the code now is thread safe 2) Why don't you use std::vector ? 3) Maybe it would be better to return bool value from update_score_safe (false if try_lock() failed and true in other cases) ? 4) It seems to me that putting mutex in public is a very bad idea –  borisbn May 31 '13 at 8:12
    
@Mark great info, that one I wasn't aware of –  Peter Smit May 31 '13 at 8:15
    
@borisbn Thanks! As for 2) I benchmarked and in this case it is faster (and it needs to be fast). 3) Good point, i did implement that. 4) If you put the responsibility of aquiring the mutex to the caller, it should be public. Do you mean to say that this is always the way to go (aquiring the mutex inside the own class methods)? –  Peter Smit May 31 '13 at 8:17
    
@didierc, also if I make the update_score() method private? –  Peter Smit May 31 '13 at 8:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not entirely; You need to ensure it is not copyable or assignable. Your 'mutex' may prohibit that (std::mutex does prohibit copying, which is sensible).

If it were copyable and/or assignable, then define the semantics; i.e. will not lock or will lock the source on copy/assign operations -- locking it would be the least surprising. Of course, it was not safe to copy as-is (double delete[]) but...

Also, I don't see anything wrong with an object abstracting synchronization -- it makes sense in some (not all) cases.

share|improve this answer
  1. I can't see any problem in your code. And... yes, the code now is thread safe (except you will throw some exceptions in update_score)
  2. Maybe it would be better to return bool from update_score_safe (false if try_lock() failed and true in other cases) ?
  3. It seems to me that putting mutex in public is a very bad idea
  4. Why don't you use std::vector ?
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Thanks! 2) Good point, i did implement that. 3) If you put the responsibility of aquiring the mutex to the caller, it should be public. Do you mean to say that this is always the way to go (aquiring the mutex inside the own class methods)? 4 I benchmarked and in this case it is faster (and it needs to be fast). –  Peter Smit May 31 '13 at 8:18
    
@PeterSmit having the class handle its own mutex is a better solution. Otherwise everything can be broken from outside. The caller need not know there is a mutex at all. –  juanchopanza May 31 '13 at 8:25
    
@PeterSmit Even if mutex should be acquired outside your class (for example, if you should guard a couple of instances of your class at the same time), then the caller should create a mutex. I do not believe, that vector is slower in release (optimized) compilation. Proof it, please –  borisbn May 31 '13 at 8:30

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