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Do you know a way to commit a file to the local repo but not to the remote?

I'd like each developer to have their own local.properties file tracked in their local git, but without being able to push it to the remote. When using .gitignore, we are losing the file when we change the branch.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm fairly sure that this is not possible, since a commit in git is atomic and cannot look different on the server and the client (then, it would have a different hash). However, you may create a new git repository in the folder that contains the local.properties file, and use that to track the file (and ignore everything else in that folder). In the outermost .gitignore, you can ignore subdir/.git, subdir/.gitignore, and subdir/local.properties.

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As Aasmund Eldhuset said, it is impossible. If you really need to track that file, I think you can track it as another repository and make a symlink from original.

mv original/local.file another/local.file
git init; git add local.file; git commit -m 'add local.file'; 
ln -s another/local.file original/local.file

Also append original/local.file to .gitignore, preventing original repository tracking it.

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Seems a bit complex for my needs, I'll stick to the manual way since the file is simple. Thanks you both for your answers – Hithredin May 31 '13 at 12:34
    
Nice solution, though (assuming that you're on Linux/mac) - in particular if you have many such files spread around; then you can gather them in one separate repository. +1 from me. – Aasmund Eldhuset May 31 '13 at 22:32

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