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I need your help, I have a structure like this:

myList = [(1,2,3),(2,4,4),(1,5,6)]

it's a list of tuples. Now I need to get every first element of each tuple in the list to e.g. replace each 1 with a 3.

The output should be: myList = [(3,2,3),(2,4,4),(3,5,6)]

I know I can make it like:

for item in myList:
   if item[0] == 1:
      item[0] = 3

But is there a other way to do this? without iterating over the whole list?

Something like: myList.getFirstItemOfEachTuple.replace(1,3)

EDIT: I could change the myList to [[1,2,3,4,5,6]...] if necessary.

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4  
tuples are immutable –  nims May 31 '13 at 8:53
    
I can change the structure to a list –  gurehbgui May 31 '13 at 8:56
    
if You are interested in every first element why this line is present if item[0] == 1 ? –  oleg May 31 '13 at 9:01
    
Please give better examples. If you want a sequences as a result, specify a sequence with at least three items as input and a result sequence. –  Mike Müller May 31 '13 at 9:15
    
added a output and other input! –  gurehbgui May 31 '13 at 9:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
>>> myList = [(1,2,3,4,5,6),(4,5,6,7,8)]
>>> dic = {1:3}
>>> [ (dic.get(x[0],x[0]),) + x[1:] for x in myList]
[(3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6), (4, 5, 6, 7, 8)]

If myList is a list of lists:

>>> myList = [[1,2,3,4,5,6],[4,5,6,7,8]]
>>> [ [dic.get(x[0],x[0]) ] + x[1:] for x in myList]
[[3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8]]

to modify the original list:

>>> myList[:] = [(dic.get(x[0],x[0]),) + x[1:] for x in myList]
>>> myList
[(3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6), (4, 5, 6, 7, 8)]
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and how to make it if the orginal list is a list of lists and not a list of tuples? –  gurehbgui May 31 '13 at 9:13
1  
@gurehbgui use this then : [ [dic.get(x[0],x[0])] + x[1:] for x in myList] –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 31 '13 at 9:16
    
works perfect, thank you –  gurehbgui May 31 '13 at 9:19
    
one more thing: what is i want to replace the second entry and not the first in the list/tuple? –  gurehbgui May 31 '13 at 9:20
1  
@gurehbgui This should work then : [ x[:1] + [dic.get(x[1],x[1]) ] + x[2:] for x in myList] –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 31 '13 at 9:22

But is there a other way to do this? without iterating over the whole list?

No. Not without iterating over the whole list.

Since you wish to examine each tuple to see if the element you wish to change is a certain number, you have to iterate over the whole list somehow. So the only remaining consideration is how to do it.

There exist good, time-tested and industry-standard guidelines that help decide how to write code: when writing code you should have code readability as a first priority. Code efficiency comes in as a distant second. There are exceptions to this rule, but they're not relevant here.

Look at your original code. It assumes item is a list, so I will too:

for item in myList:
    if item[0] == 1:
        item[0] = 3

Now compare with Ashwini's suggestion:

dic = {1: 3}
myList[:] = [[dic.get(x[0], x[0])] + x[1:] for x in myList]

Now ask yourself:

  • Which one is easiest to read and understand? I think the answer is obvious.
  • Which one is more efficient?

Let's look at the efficiency:

  • Your original code: For each item in myList, perform a single list lookup and then possibly a single list assignment, both extremely fast operations.

  • Ashwinis code: Rebuild the entire structure. For each item in myList python needs to create three new lists (five if you want to change an item that's not the first). Python must allocate new memory for each list and garbage collect a lot of old lists, both rather slow operations. All for the sake of cramming it into a one-liner.

Please, go with your original code. Here's why:

  • It's the obvious way to do it.
  • It's the pythonic way to do it.
  • It's the most readable way to do it.
  • It's the most efficient way to do it.

Which means it's the right way to do it.

If you want a one-liner, make it a function:

def conditional_sublist_assign(myList, index, from, to):
    """
    For each `item` in `myList`, set `item[index] = to` if `item[index] == from`.
    """
    for item in myList:
        if item[index] == from:
            item[index] = to

# Here's your one-liner:
conditional_sublist_assign(myList, 0, 1, 3)

To lend some more weight to my arguments, here are some relevant lines from The Zen of Python:

  • Beautiful is better than ugly.
  • Simple is better than complex.
  • Readability counts.
  • There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.
  • If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.
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+1, for "If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea"... if only that was my mantra... unfortunately I am the one liner type :'( –  azorius Jun 3 '13 at 13:40

With list comprehensions.

Condition first tuple item must be 1:

>>> L = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> [[3] + x[1:] if x[0] == 1 else x for x in L]
[[3, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

Solution for tuples instead of lists inside the list:

>>> L = [(1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9)]
>>> [(3,)  + x[1:] if x[0] == 1 else x  for x in L]
[(3, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9)]
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-1: OP wants 3 to replace the first element if it is a 1 –  Boud May 31 '13 at 9:05
    
"get every first element of each tuple in the list to e.g. replace each 1 with a 3." Contradicts the code of the OP though. –  Mike Müller May 31 '13 at 9:06

you can do that in numpy, numpy is also 50 times faster than python so if speed is important, that is definatly the way to go:

import numpy as np
myList = [(1,2,3),(2,4,4),(1,5,6)]
# convert list of tuples to 2D numpy array
myList = np.array(myList)
# get an array of all first element, syntax: myList[x, y] x and w and be ranges 1:3 og numbers like 1
# all the first elements are as follows:
first = myList[:,0]
# you can then make a true / false vector as follows
myList[first == 1,0] = 3
print myList
# prints:
#[[3 2 3]
# [2 4 4]
# [3 5 6]]
share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution, +1. But OP, keep in mind that numpy is a non-builtin module. Also, it's quite expensive to import, so a pure python solution gets a good head start. This means you need to do a lot of number crunching to "catch up", so to speak, and make using numpy actually pay off in run time. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow May 31 '13 at 11:42
    
@LauritzV.Thaulow, Thanks, import numpy takes 0.15-0.2 sec on my computer, however making a numpy array from a python list/tuple is unfortunately more expensive than looping trough the entire list... so my trick is worthless if he only needs it once pr list :) –  azorius Jun 3 '13 at 13:31

you can't change the value of tuple, it's immutable. But you convert tuple to list and change the value

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