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This might be something that is known to most, but struck me as a surprise.

Given the following test:

import org.scalatest.{BeforeAndAfterAll, FunSpec}

class MyFunSpecTest extends FunSpec with BeforeAndAfterAll {
    override def beforeAll {
        println("Inside beforeAll")
    }

    describe("Testing something") {
        println("Inside describe")
        it("should fail") {
            println("Inside it")
            fail("not yet implemented")
        }
    }
}

I would have anticipated output:

Inside beforeAll
Inside describe
Inside it
[info] MyFunSpecTest:
[info] Testing something
[info] - should fail *** FAILED ***
[info]   not yet implemented (MyFunSpec.scala:12)

Instead the output is:

Inside describe
Inside beforeAll
Inside it
[info] MyFunSpecTest:
[info] Testing something
[info] - should fail *** FAILED ***
[info]   not yet implemented (MyFunSpec.scala:12)

This at least with scalatest_2.9.1 versions 2.0.M5b and 2.0.M5.

The way we found this out was with Selenium tests where we created web driver in beforeAll - hook and used it in tests. For as long as we initialized lazy vals in describe block and used them within it block there were no problems since computation was delayed until it, in which state beforeAll was already executed. Problems naturally occurred the first time we introduced something that was computed in describe block and depended on the web driver (which was not constructed at this point).

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Have you tried to replace println() with info()? –  Beryllium May 31 '13 at 9:16

1 Answer 1

The before() gets called before each it(), not before each describe(). Try moving your code to the it() and let us know if that helps.

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Its logical that before gets called before every it. The original problem was with BeforeAndAfterAll where beforeAll is run after describe block. I copy-pasted wrong test code (where I used BeforeAndAfter) to the original post. I updated the example to use BeforeAndAfterAll. Sorry for the hassle. I assume the confusion we had is more evident now. –  uhef Jun 5 '13 at 11:42
    
Ah, I see. What you anticipated isn't entirely unreasonable. I see why it runs the way it does, too. I believe we have to think of each it() as a test in their terminology. Therefore, the beforeAll is executed precisely before all of the it()'s. It makes no guarantees as to execution order with respect to other artifacts such as describe(). –  joescii Jun 5 '13 at 15:26

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