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I am trying to create a scripting widget for R using the tcltk package. But I don't know how to to create a STOP button to interrupt a script coming from the widget. Basically, I would like to have a button, a menu option, and/or a key binding that will interrupt the current script execution, but I can't figure out how to make it work.

One (non-ideal) strategy is to just use the RGui STOP button (or <ESC> or <Ctrl-c> on the console), but this seems cause the tk widget to hang permanently.

Here's a minimal example of the widget based on the tcl/tk examples (http://bioinf.wehi.edu.au/~wettenhall/RTclTkExamples/evalRcode.html):

require(tcltk)

tkscript <- function() {
    tt <- tktoplevel()
    txt <- tktext(tt, height=10)
    tkpack(txt)
    run <- function() {
        code <- tclvalue(tkget(txt,"0.0","end"))
        e <- try(parse(text=code))
        if (inherits(e, "try-error")) {
            tkmessageBox(message="Syntax error", icon="error")
            return()
        }
        print(eval(e))
    }
    tkbind(txt,"<Control-r>",run)
}

tkscript()

In the scripting widget if you try executing Sys.sleep(20) and then interrupt from the console, the widget hangs. The same thing happens if one were to run, for example, an infinite loop, like while(TRUE) 2+2.

I think what I'm experiencing may be similar to the bug reported here: https://bugs.r-project.org/bugzilla3/show_bug.cgi?id=14730

Also, I should mention that I'm running this on R 3.0.0 on Windows (x64), so maybe the problem is platform-specific.

Any thoughts on how to interrupt the running script without causing the widget to hang?

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Reason for the downvote? –  Thomas Jul 11 '13 at 9:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It depends on what the script is doing; a script that is sitting waiting for the user to do something is easy to interrupt (since you can make it listen for your interruption message) but a script that is doing an intensive loop is rather more tricky. The possible solutions depend on the version of Tcl inside.

Interpreter Cancellation — Requires 8.6

If you are using Tcl 8.6, you can use interpreter cancellation to stop the script. All you have to do is arrange for:

interp cancel -unwind

to be run, and the script will return control back to you. A reasonable way of doing this would be to use the extra Tcl package TclX (or Expect) to install a signal handler that will run the command when a signal is received:

package require Tcl 8.6
package require TclX

# Our signal handler
proc doInterrupt {} {
    # Print a message so you can see what's happening
    puts "It goes boom!"
    # Unwind the stack back to the R code
    interp cancel -unwind
}

# Install it...
signal trap sigint doInterrupt

# Now evaluate the code which might try to run forever

Adding signal handling in earlier versions is possible, but not quite as easy as you can't guarantee that things will return control to you so easily; the stack unwinding isn't there.

Execution Time Limiting — Requires 8.5 (or 8.6)

The other thing you could try is setting an execution time limit on a slave interpreter and running the user script in that slave. The time limit machinery will then guarantee a trap back to you every so often, giving you a chance to check for interruption and a way to do the stack unwinding. This is a considerably more complex method.

proc nextSecond {} {
    clock add [clock seconds] 1 second
}
interp create child
proc checkInterrupt {} {
    if {["decide if the R code wanted an interrupt"]} {
        # Do nothing
        return
    }
    # Reset the time limit to another second ahead
    interp limit child time -seconds [nextSecond]
}

interp limit child time -seconds [nextSecond] -command checkInterrupt
interp eval child "the user script"

Think of this mechanism being a lot like how an operating system works, and yes, it can stop a tight loop.

Use a Subprocess — Any version of Tcl

The most portable mechanism is to run the script in a subprocess (with the tclsh program; the exact name varies by version, platform and distribution, but it's all variations on that) and just kill off that subprocess when it is no longer wanted with pskill. The downside of this is that you cannot (easily) carry any state over from one execution to another; subprocesses are pretty isolated from each other. The other methods described above can leave the state able to be accessed from another run: they do a real interrupt, whereas this destroys.

Also, I don't know exactly how to start the subprocess in such a way that you can communicate with it from R while it is still running; system and system2 don't seem to quite give enough control, and hacking something with forking is non-portable. Needs an R expert here. Alternatively, use a Tcl script (running inside the R process) to do it with:

set executable "tclsh";    # Adjust this line
set scriptfile "file/where/you/put/the_user/script.tcl"

# Open a bi-directional pipe to talk to the subprocess
set pipeline [open |[list $executable $scriptfile] "r+"]

# Get the subprocess's PID
set thePID [pid $pipeline]

That is actually reasonably portable to Windows (if not perfectly so) but intermediate states with forking are not.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 These are all really helpful. Unfortunately, I think R ships with tcl 8.5 on most/all platforms (maybe this will change in the future?) otherwise your first solution sounds great. My inclination is to try out your second solution, though it sound similar to just using setTimeLimit in R. The third solution is also interesting but as you say creates some difficulties due to subprocesses being isolated. –  Thomas Jun 1 '13 at 21:21

I seem to have found a solution to prevent the tk widget from hanging by embedding the eval in a tryCatch that handles interrupt conditions. Unfortunately, it requires interruption from the console rather than the widget, but it does work. tryCatch is pretty poorly documented, so I'm putting this out here in case anyone else has similar needs in the future.

require(tcltk)

tkscript <- function() {
    tt <- tktoplevel()
    txt <- tktext(tt, height=10)
    tkpack(txt)
    run <- function() {
        code <- tclvalue(tkget(txt,"0.0","end"))
        e <- try(parse(text=code))
        if (inherits(e, "try-error")) {
            tkmessageBox(message="Parse error", icon="error")
            tkfocus(txt)
            return()
        }
        e <- tryCatch(eval(e),
            error = function(errmsg)
                tkmessageBox(message=as.character(errmsg), icon="error"),
            interrupt = function(errmsg)
                tkmessageBox(message=as.character(errmsg), icon="error")
        )
        print(eval(e))
    }
    tkbind(txt,"<Control-r>",run)
}

tkscript()

Another strategy I stumbled across is using tools::pskill (in the form pskill(Sys.getpid(), SIGINT) as a tk menu option) to interrupt the process, but - at least on Windows - this terminates the entire R process (including the tk widget). So, that's not a great solution but at least seems to exit everything as an absolute fallback.

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1  
You'd need a signal handler installed; I don't know if R sets one, but Tcl doesn't (except for a few of the more obscure signals) and also doesn't provide a mechanism for setting one. Except by way of an extension package like TclX… –  Donal Fellows Jun 2 '13 at 18:22

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