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I have this code in c++ ( it is after I did some tests to see why I can not read enough data from file, so it is not final code and I am looking to find why I am getting this result)

size_t readSize=629312;
_rawImageFile.seekg(0,ifstream::end);
size_t s=_rawImageFile.tellg();
char *buffer=(char*) malloc(readSize);
_rawImageFile.seekg(0);
int p=_rawImageFile.tellg();
_rawImageFile.read(buffer,readSize);
size_t extracted = _rawImageFile.gcount();
cout << "s="<< s <<endl;
cout << "p="<< p <<endl;
cout << "readsize="<< readSize<<endl;
cout << "extracted="<< extracted <<endl;
cout << "eof ="<< _rawImageFile.eofbit<<endl;
cout << "fail="<< _rawImageFile.failbit <<endl;

The output is as follow:

s=3493940224
p=0
readsize=629312
extracted=2085
eof =1
fail=2

As you can see the file size is 3493940224 and I am at the start of file (p=0) and I am trying to read 629312 bytes, but I can only read 2085?

What is the problem with this code? I did open this file in other methods and read some data out of it, but am using seekg to move pointer to the beginning of file.

The file was opened as binary.

edit 1

To find a solution, I put all code inside a function and here is it:

    _config=config;
    ifstream t_rawImageFile;
    t_rawImageFile.open(rawImageFileName,std::ifstream::in || std::ios::binary );
    t_rawImageFile.seekg (0);
    size_t readSize=629312;
    t_rawImageFile.seekg(0,ifstream::end);
    size_t s=t_rawImageFile.tellg();
    char *buffer=(char*) malloc(readSize);
    t_rawImageFile.seekg(0);
    size_t p=t_rawImageFile.tellg();
    t_rawImageFile.read(buffer,readSize);
    size_t x=t_rawImageFile.tellg();
    size_t extracted = t_rawImageFile.gcount();
    cout << "s="<< s <<endl;
    cout << "p="<< p <<endl;
    cout << "x="<< x <<endl;
    cout << "readsize="<< readSize<<endl;
    cout << "extracted="<< extracted <<endl;
    cout << "eof ="<< t_rawImageFile.eof()<<endl;
cout << "fail="<< t_rawImageFile.fail() <<endl;

and the result is:

s=3493940224
p=0
x=4294967295
readsize=629312
extracted=2085
eof =1
fail=1

Interestingly, after read the file pointer moves to a very big value. is it possible that since the file size is very big, the application fails?

edit 2

Tested the same code with another file. the result is as follow:

s=2993007872
p=0
x=4294967295
readsize=629312
extracted=1859
eof =1
fail=1

What I can read from this test is that: after read the file pointer moves to a big number which is always the same. The amount that it reads depend on file (!).

edit 3

After changing the size_t to fstream::pos_type the result is as follow:

s=2993007872
p=0
x=-1
readsize=629312
extracted=1859
eof =1
fail=1

Why file position goes to -1 after a read?

share|improve this question
1  
Where and how do you set readSize? Also, what is the stream state (fail/eof/etc)? –  Joachim Pileborg May 31 '13 at 11:10
1  
Unrelated to your problem, but why do you use malloc in a C++ program? –  Joachim Pileborg May 31 '13 at 11:12
2  
C++ is a multi-paradigm language. It is C++ code. (question remains how good the code is) –  Itsik May 31 '13 at 11:15
4  
@not-sehe: Since when did C have class member functions and overloaded operators? This is C++, even if it doesn't use the idioms you prefer. –  Mike Seymour May 31 '13 at 11:22
1  
I can't see any other obvious reason than that something is truncating your file while you have it open, so your tellg() shows a location that's where you seekg'd to before truncation. –  Joachim Isaksson May 31 '13 at 11:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
t_rawImageFile.open(rawImageFileName, std::ifstream::in || std::ios::binary );

...does not open the file in binary mode. Since || is the lazy or operator and std::ifstream::in is non zero, the whole expression has the value 1.

t_rawImageFile.open(rawImageFileName, std::ifstream::in | std::ios::binary );

...will surely work better.

share|improve this answer

You don't show the part where your file is being opened, but I'm pretty sure it is missing ios::binary to make sure the C runtime code doesn't interpret CTRL-Z (or CTRL-D) as end of file.

share|improve this answer
    
the file opened in this way: _rawImageFile.open(rawImageFileName,std::ifstream::in || std::ifstream::binary); –  mans May 31 '13 at 13:02
    
Then something else is wrong. Without access to your file and your environment, it's hard to say what. –  Mats Petersson May 31 '13 at 13:04

Change this line:

t_rawImageFile.open(rawImageFileName,std::ifstream::in || std::ios::binary );

into this:

t_rawImageFile.open(rawImageFileName,std::ifstream::in | std::ios::binary );
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