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I have a module:

# a.coffee:
@f = -> console.info 'Hell, oh, world!' # Note that exports == this

and another module from which I require it:

# b.coffee:
a = require './a'
a.f()

I want to run the code in b.coffee without an explicit build step for generating an a.js.

In NodeJS, all I need to do is require('coffee-script') once before anything else.

Is there an equivalent trick for the browser?

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2 Answers 2

Browsers don't natively support coffeescript. If you just want to be able to make changes to a coffee file and reference it without having to manually run a command each time, you can use the coffee compiler to watch the file and update a js file as you make changes to it.

coffee --watch --compile experimental.coffee

There will have to be a step where a js file is created and referenced when working in the browser though.

update from the comments

Since you want a library to support commonjs modules anyway, you might want to look into browserify. It has support for something like what you want to do with its transform function: https://github.com/substack/node-browserify#btransformtr.

This may never be quite as nice as you'd like it though. The compilation process has to happen for a browser to read coffeescript. For performance reasons its going to be much better if that happens on the server, rather than on the client where you're using the users time every single time!

The compilation can be simple. Since you want to have static files only on the server, its trivial to write a script that takes all your coffee files, bundles them into a compressed js file, and then you can reference that file in your html. That can be done with the coffee compiler or a build tool like grunt.

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Well, if this can work: <script src="a.coffee" type="text/coffeescript">, why shouldn't require() be possible too? --watch is cool but it means a separate process, so it's not good enough in my case (I'm deploying static files to a server). –  ngn May 31 '13 at 19:08
    
That can work because somebody has written a script to support it. :) Browsers also don't natively support require :) what libary are you using to implement it in the browser? It may provide a way to do what you want, but you haven't told us what it is. –  Ben McCormick May 31 '13 at 19:13
    
Yes, I understand that browsers don't support require(). I'm looking for a decent implementation. I already tried RequireJS (requirejs.org) and the "stitch"-ing approach (github.com/sstephenson/stitch). –  ngn May 31 '13 at 19:23
    
You might want to look into browserify. IT has support for something like what you want to do with its transform function: github.com/substack/node-browserify This may never be quite as nice as you'd like it though. The compilation process has to happen for the browser to read coffeescript. For performance reason its going to be much better if that happens on the server –  Ben McCormick May 31 '13 at 19:57
    
Browserify is pretty close, right. Unfortunately it too demands a preprocessing step, like "stitch". –  ngn May 31 '13 at 20:18

Before I tell you how, I want to make it clear that no one should ever do this in anything that even remotely resembles a production environment, since this forces each browser to compile it on every page load. With that in mind:

Check out http://jashkenas.github.io/coffee-script/#scripts. If you put the CoffeeScript compiler in your page via a script tag, then you can include CoffeeScript files (or even inline source) with a <script type="text/coffeescript"> tag. Script will be compiled and run in the order they appear in the html.

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I don't mind it being a bit slower. <script type="text/coffeescript"> loads the scripts in the global scope. That's not what I want. I want them to be loaded as CommonJS modules, which means being given exports and require as free variables (preferably with exports==this). And, of course, I'd like to avoid putting any artificial wrappers around my modules' code (e.g. that's the way RequireJS works). –  ngn May 31 '13 at 19:19

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