Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can't we yield more than one value in the python generator functions?

Example,

In [677]: def gen():
   .....:     for i in range(5):
   .....:         yield i, i+1
   .....:         

In [680]: k1, k2 = gen()
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
ValueError                                Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-680-b21f6543a7e9> in <module>()
----> 1 k1, k2 = a()

ValueError: too many values to unpack

This works as follows:

In [678]: b = a()

In [679]: list(b)
Out[679]: [(0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5)]

Same results even when I do this:

In [692]: def a():
    for i in range(5):
        yield i
        yield i+1

Thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Because gen() returns a generator (a single item - so it can't be unpacked as two), it needs to be advanced first to get the values...

g = gen()
a, b = next(g)

It works with list because that implicitly consumes the generator.

Can we further make this a generator? Something like this:

g = gen();
def yield_g():
    yield g.next();
    k1,k2 = yield_g();

and therefore list(k1) would give [0,1,2,3,4] and list(k2) would give [1,2,3,4,5].

Keep your existing generator, and use izip (or zip):

from itertools import izip
k1, k2 = izip(*gen())
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your function gen returns a generator and not values as you might expect judging from the example you gave. If you iterate over the generator the pairs of values will be yielded:

In [2]: def gen():
   ...:     for i in range(5):
   ...:         yield i, i+1
   ...:         

In [3]: for k1, k2 in gen():
   ...:     print k1, k2
   ...:     
0 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 5
share|improve this answer
    
That's not it. See Jon Clements' answer. –  Marcin May 31 '13 at 11:32
1  
Well, my example is similar, in that it advances the generator using a for-loop. I agree that Jon's answer is more elaborative and has a better explanation of what is going wrong. I still don't understand the downvote on my answer, though. –  David Zwicker May 31 '13 at 11:41
    
Can we further make this a generator? Something like this g = gen(); def yield_g(): yield g.next(); k1,k2 = yield_g(); and therefore list(k1) would give [0,1,2,3,4] and list(k2) [1,2,3,4,5] –  Shyam Sunder May 31 '13 at 12:06
    
I downvoted this because it is essentially wrong. The problem is not that OP didn't use his generator in a list. The problem is that he has misunderstood what the expression gen() returns, and you do nothing to correct that. Indeed, you appear to share that misconception. Indeed, your first sentence is specifically incorrect - the generator gen is a function. –  Marcin May 31 '13 at 12:11
1  
@Marcin: I agree that gen() is a function that returns a generator (my first sentence was indeed wrong). Still, I think it is important to mention that generators are usually iterated over and a for-loop is the natural thing to do there. I agree that my answer could profit from some more explanation. –  David Zwicker May 31 '13 at 13:02
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.