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I am trying to check whether the last 2 bits in a byte variable have been set to 1. This is what I have:

if ((my_byte & (1 << 0)) == 1 && (my_byte & (1 << 1)) == 1)

However, if it doesn't seem to be working as the code does not go into the if statement. I am certain the value of my_byte is 3.

Would anyone know what I am doing wrong?

Thank you for your help.

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2  
How about if (my_byte & 3 == 3) or if (my_byte & 0b11 == 0b11) since Java7? –  Pshemo May 31 '13 at 11:42
    
Very good, but note operator precedence; see answers. –  Bathsheba May 31 '13 at 12:09

2 Answers 2

Use 'if ((my_byte & 0b11) == 0b11)'

i.e. you're ANDing your number with a number with the two final bits both set to 1. The expression will be true if, and only if, m_byte has its last two bits set to 1.

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1  
If needs boolean not int. –  Pshemo May 31 '13 at 11:46
    
Pshemo: good point. See my edit. C habits die hard. –  Bathsheba May 31 '13 at 11:47
    
@Pshemo This should be faster way because bitwise operator.. am I correct? –  Grijesh Chauhan May 31 '13 at 11:48
2  
It should be (my_byte & 0b11) == 0b11 not (my_byte & 0b11) != 0. For example: in case that my_byte = 0b10 or 0b01 –  johnchen902 May 31 '13 at 11:51
1  
@Bathsheba entire if condition should be in parenthesis :). Also your test is not perfect. Lets say my_byte = 0b01, then 0b01 & 0b11 = 0b01 which is != 0 so test will return true, but it should be wrong because there are no two ones at the end. –  Pshemo May 31 '13 at 11:55

The value of the second or statement is 2 if the bit is set:

if ((my_byte & (1 << 0)) == 1 && (my_byte & (1 << 1)) == 2)

As @johnchecn902 suggests, it becomes clearer if you write it as (my_byte & (1 << 1)) == 0b10.

There is also no need to divide this into two steps. The whole expression can be simplified to

if ((my_byte & 0b11) == 0b11)
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2  
Maybe 0b10 will be more clear. –  johnchen902 May 31 '13 at 11:41
3  
Beware of precedence : It should be ((my_byte & 0b11) == 0b11) –  johnchen902 May 31 '13 at 11:48
    
I fixed it. My first 2000 rep edit ;-) –  Bathsheba May 31 '13 at 11:54

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