Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have a file like so:

+jaklfjdskalfjkdsaj
fkldsjafkljdkaljfsd
-jslakflkdsalfkdls;
+sdjafkdjsakfjdskal

I only want to find and count the amount of times during this file a line that starts with - is immediately followed by a line that starts with +.

Rules:

  • No external scripts
  • Must be done from within a bash script
  • Must be inline

I could figure out how to do this in a Python script, for instance, but I've never had to do something this extensive in Bash.

Could anyone help me out? I figure it'll end up being grep, perl, or maybe a talented sed line -- but these are things I'm still learning.

Thank you all!

share|improve this question
2  
Removed the Python tag as you don't appear to want an answer using it. –  Jon Clements May 31 '13 at 12:04
    
Thanks! I was told I could use python, so long as it was inline, so I figured I'd include it anyway. Thanks for correcting the mistake! –  James Roseman May 31 '13 at 12:06
    
Python's not great for one liners on the command line... so wouldn't be a viable answer –  Jon Clements May 31 '13 at 12:07
    
Though not great for one liners, it is possible, and is capable of working, and therefore is a viable answer. Thanks for the edit though! perl, awk, or grep were all much more suited for the job, so you're right in a way! –  James Roseman May 31 '13 at 13:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Easy in Perl:

perl -lne '$c++ if $p and /^\+/; $p = /^-/ }{ print $c' FILE
share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect! Do you mind if I ask how you got started on learning Perl regexes? I can't seem to get started to wrap my mind around it. –  James Roseman May 31 '13 at 12:02
    
}{ should be similar to END{}. Is there any reference for this syntax? –  Сухой27 May 31 '13 at 12:10
1  
@mpapec: It is called the "Eskimo greeting operator". See catonmat.net/blog/secret-perl-operators/#eskimo –  choroba May 31 '13 at 12:12
    
@mpapec : perlsecret –  Zaid May 31 '13 at 12:42
1  
@JamesRoseman : perldoc perlrequick, perldoc perlretut, and (if you're feeling brave) perldoc perlre, in that order. –  Zaid May 31 '13 at 12:44

Pure bash:

unset c p
while read line ; do
    [[ $line == +* && $p == 0 ]] && (( c++ ))
    [[ $line == -* ]]
    p=$?
done < FILE
echo $c
share|improve this answer

grep -A1 "^-" $file | grep "^+" | wc -l

The first grep finds all of the lines starting with -, and the -A1 causes it to also output the line after the match too.

We then grep that output for any lines starting with +. Logically:

  1. We know the output of the first grep is only the -XXX lines and the following lines
  2. We know that a +xxx line cannot also be a -xxx line

Therefore, any +xxx lines must be following lines, and should be counted, which we do with wc -l

share|improve this answer

Another Perl example. Not as terse as choroba's, but more transparent in how it works:

perl -e'while (<>) { $last = $cur; $cur = $_; print $last, $cur if substr($last, 0, 1) eq "-" && substr($cur, 0, 1) eq "+" }' < infile

Output:

-jslakflkdsalfkdls;
+sdjafkdjsakfjdskal
share|improve this answer

awk one-liner:

awk -v FS='' '{x=x sprintf("%s", $1)}END{print gsub(/-\+/,"",x)}' file

e.g.

kent$  cat file
+jaklfjdskalfjkdsaj
fkldsjafkljdkaljfsd
-jslakflkdsalfkdls;
+sdjafkdjsakfjdskal
-
-
-
+
-
+
foo
+

kent$  awk -v FS='' '{x=x sprintf("%s", $1)}END{print gsub(/-\+/,"",x)}' file
3
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.