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There are two sites. The main site, where there is an authentication logic for users and second site that works as an additional service for main site and has its own database, code, technology etc. Both sites are own by different teams. Second site should be able to authenticate users, but has no access to database and code of the main site and is hosted on the different domain.
Now, authentication works in following way:

1. Second site show login page where in an iframe the login form of main site is loaded.
2. When user enters his credentials and clicks enter, all authenticate logic runs through the main site and user is authenticated only by main site.
3. Main site sends request through http(s) that informs second site about user that needs to be logged in by some unique identifier of the user (email).
4. Second site receives request from main site and simply creates authentication cookies without any validation and even without to be able to access to the user credentials (because of login form in iframe of main site).

The next problem appears here:
- Encryption of the messages from main site to second site. Second site uses asp.net mvc, but main site can use any different technology. Every message can contain additional piece of information, such as login and password for main site.

Which kind of encryption can be used here to encrypt message through the sites? Maybe someone know more appropriate way of doing this kind of interaction between sites. The main goal for all of this is easy integration between main site and second site.

Thanks in advance, Dima.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Which kind of encryption can be used here to encrypt message through the sites?

A symmetric encryption algorithm such as AES seems a logical choice. Both sites will share a common secret key that will be used by the first site to encrypt the data and by the second site to decrypt the data.

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Thanks Darin for your fast reply. – Dima Shmidt May 31 '13 at 12:27

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