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I'm looking for a way to get a number which will almost surely change when running the code on different machines and almost surely stay the same between two runs on the same machine.

If I were doing this as a shell script in Linux, I would use something like this:

{ uname -n ; cat /proc/meminfo | head -n1 ; cat /proc/cpuinfo ; } | md5sum

But I need this in C++ (with boost) and at least on Windows, Linux and Mac.

share|improve this question
4  
There's a very good chance that will not give you consistent results on the same machine; most modern CPUs have dynamic frequency scaling, and /proc/cpuinfo reflects the instantaneous frequency! – Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '13 at 13:50
    
Possible duplicate – BoBTFish May 31 '13 at 13:50
2  
This looks like the program will be networked (otherwise an ID sounds useless). In that case, you might be better off if you get a unique ID from the server your program connects to and store it locally for subsequent use. – Nikos C. May 31 '13 at 13:56
    
@Oli Charlesworth: Well, that is just a minor detail, I could always grep only the non-changing fields. – cube May 31 '13 at 14:02
1  
What about using the mac address of the local box? You would have to write platform independent code to look it up, but it would only be a few lines. – Salgar May 31 '13 at 14:26
up vote 24 down vote accepted

To generate a mostly unique machine id, you can get a few serial numbers from various pieces of hardware on the system. Most processors will have a CPU serial number, the hard disks each have a number, and each network card will have a unique MAC address.

You can get these and build a fingerprint for the machine. You might want to allow some of these numbers to change before declaring it a new machine. ( e.g. if the 2 out of three are the same, then the machine is the same ). So you can deal somewhat gracefully from having a component upgraded.

I've clipped some code from one of my projects that gets these numbers.

Windows:

#include "machine_id.h"   

#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN        
#include <windows.h>      
#include <intrin.h>       
#include <iphlpapi.h>     


// we just need this for purposes of unique machine id. So any one or two mac's is       
// fine. 
u16 hashMacAddress( PIP_ADAPTER_INFO info )          
{        
   u16 hash = 0;          
   for ( u32 i = 0; i < info->AddressLength; i++ )   
   {     
      hash += ( info->Address[i] << (( i & 1 ) * 8 ));        
   }     
   return hash;           
}        

void getMacHash( u16& mac1, u16& mac2 )              
{        
   IP_ADAPTER_INFO AdapterInfo[32];                  
   DWORD dwBufLen = sizeof( AdapterInfo );           

   DWORD dwStatus = GetAdaptersInfo( AdapterInfo, &dwBufLen );                  
   if ( dwStatus != ERROR_SUCCESS )                  
      return; // no adapters.      

   PIP_ADAPTER_INFO pAdapterInfo = AdapterInfo;      
   mac1 = hashMacAddress( pAdapterInfo );            
   if ( pAdapterInfo->Next )       
      mac2 = hashMacAddress( pAdapterInfo->Next );   

   // sort the mac addresses. We don't want to invalidate     
   // both macs if they just change order.           
   if ( mac1 > mac2 )     
   {     
      u16 tmp = mac2;     
      mac2 = mac1;        
      mac1 = tmp;         
   }     
}        

u16 getVolumeHash()       
{        
   DWORD serialNum = 0;   

   // Determine if this volume uses an NTFS file system.      
   GetVolumeInformation( "c:\\", NULL, 0, &serialNum, NULL, NULL, NULL, 0 );    
   u16 hash = (u16)(( serialNum + ( serialNum >> 16 )) & 0xFFFF );              

   return hash;           
}        

u16 getCpuHash()          
{        
   int cpuinfo[4] = { 0, 0, 0, 0 };                  
   __cpuid( cpuinfo, 0 );          
   u16 hash = 0;          
   u16* ptr = (u16*)(&cpuinfo[0]); 
   for ( u32 i = 0; i < 8; i++ )   
      hash += ptr[i];     

   return hash;           
}        

const char* getMachineName()       
{        
   static char computerName[1024]; 
   DWORD size = 1024;     
   GetComputerName( computerName, &size );           
   return &(computerName[0]);      
}

Linux and OsX:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>          
#include <errno.h>           
#include <sys/types.h>       
#include <sys/socket.h>      
#include <sys/ioctl.h>  
#include <sys/resource.h>    
#include <sys/utsname.h>       
#include <netdb.h>           
#include <netinet/in.h>      
#include <netinet/in_systm.h>                 
#include <netinet/ip.h>      
#include <netinet/ip_icmp.h> 
#include <assert.h>

#ifdef DARWIN                    
#include <net/if_dl.h>       
#include <ifaddrs.h>         
#include <net/if_types.h>    
#else //!DARWIN              
// #include <linux/if.h>        
// #include <linux/sockios.h>   
#endif //!DARWIN               

const char* getMachineName() 
{ 
   static struct utsname u;  

   if ( uname( &u ) < 0 )    
   {       
      assert(0);             
      return "unknown";      
   }       

   return u.nodename;        
}   


//---------------------------------get MAC addresses ------------------------------------unsigned short-unsigned short----------        
// we just need this for purposes of unique machine id. So any one or two mac's is fine.            
unsigned short hashMacAddress( unsigned char* mac )                 
{ 
   unsigned short hash = 0;             

   for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < 6; i++ )              
   {       
      hash += ( mac[i] << (( i & 1 ) * 8 ));           
   }       
   return hash;              
} 

void getMacHash( unsigned short& mac1, unsigned short& mac2 )       
{ 
   mac1 = 0;                 
   mac2 = 0;                 

#ifdef DARWIN                

   struct ifaddrs* ifaphead; 
   if ( getifaddrs( &ifaphead ) != 0 )        
      return;                

   // iterate over the net interfaces         
   bool foundMac1 = false;   
   struct ifaddrs* ifap;     
   for ( ifap = ifaphead; ifap; ifap = ifap->ifa_next )                  
   {       
      struct sockaddr_dl* sdl = (struct sockaddr_dl*)ifap->ifa_addr;     
      if ( sdl && ( sdl->sdl_family == AF_LINK ) && ( sdl->sdl_type == IFT_ETHER ))                 
      {    
          if ( !foundMac1 )  
          {                  
             foundMac1 = true;                
             mac1 = hashMacAddress( (unsigned char*)(LLADDR(sdl))); //sdl->sdl_data) + sdl->sdl_nlen) );       
          } else {           
             mac2 = hashMacAddress( (unsigned char*)(LLADDR(sdl))); //sdl->sdl_data) + sdl->sdl_nlen) );       
             break;          
          }                  
      }    
   }       

   freeifaddrs( ifaphead );  

#else // !DARWIN             

   int sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, IPPROTO_IP );                  
   if ( sock < 0 ) return;   

   // enumerate all IP addresses of the system         
   struct ifconf conf;       
   char ifconfbuf[ 128 * sizeof(struct ifreq)  ];      
   memset( ifconfbuf, 0, sizeof( ifconfbuf ));         
   conf.ifc_buf = ifconfbuf; 
   conf.ifc_len = sizeof( ifconfbuf );        
   if ( ioctl( sock, SIOCGIFCONF, &conf ))    
   {       
      assert(0);             
      return;                
   }       

   // get MAC address        
   bool foundMac1 = false;   
   struct ifreq* ifr;        
   for ( ifr = conf.ifc_req; (char*)ifr < (char*)conf.ifc_req + conf.ifc_len; ifr++ ) 
   {       
      if ( ifr->ifr_addr.sa_data == (ifr+1)->ifr_addr.sa_data )          
         continue;  // duplicate, skip it     

      if ( ioctl( sock, SIOCGIFFLAGS, ifr ))           
         continue;  // failed to get flags, skip it    
      if ( ioctl( sock, SIOCGIFHWADDR, ifr ) == 0 )    
      {    
         if ( !foundMac1 )   
         { 
            foundMac1 = true;                 
            mac1 = hashMacAddress( (unsigned char*)&(ifr->ifr_addr.sa_data));       
         } else {            
            mac2 = hashMacAddress( (unsigned char*)&(ifr->ifr_addr.sa_data));       
            break;           
         } 
      }    
   }       

   close( sock );            

#endif // !DARWIN            

   // sort the mac addresses. We don't want to invalidate                
   // both macs if they just change order.    
   if ( mac1 > mac2 )        
   {       
      unsigned short tmp = mac2;        
      mac2 = mac1;           
      mac1 = tmp;            
   }       
} 

unsigned short getVolumeHash()          
{ 
   // we don't have a 'volume serial number' like on windows. Lets hash the system name instead.    
   unsigned char* sysname = (unsigned char*)getMachineName();       
   unsigned short hash = 0;             

   for ( unsigned int i = 0; sysname[i]; i++ )         
      hash += ( sysname[i] << (( i & 1 ) * 8 ));       

   return hash;              
} 

#ifdef DARWIN                
 #include <mach-o/arch.h>    
 unsigned short getCpuHash()            
 {         
     const NXArchInfo* info = NXGetLocalArchInfo();    
     unsigned short val = 0;            
     val += (unsigned short)info->cputype;               
     val += (unsigned short)info->cpusubtype;            
     return val;             
 }         

#else // !DARWIN             

 static void getCpuid( unsigned int* p, unsigned int ax )       
 {         
    __asm __volatile         
    (   "movl %%ebx, %%esi\n\t"               
        "cpuid\n\t"          
        "xchgl %%ebx, %%esi" 
        : "=a" (p[0]), "=S" (p[1]),           
          "=c" (p[2]), "=d" (p[3])            
        : "0" (ax)           
    );     
 }         

 unsigned short getCpuHash()            
 {         
    unsigned int cpuinfo[4] = { 0, 0, 0, 0 };          
    getCpuid( cpuinfo, 0 );  
    unsigned short hash = 0;            
    unsigned int* ptr = (&cpuinfo[0]);                 
    for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < 4; i++ )             
       hash += (ptr[i] & 0xFFFF) + ( ptr[i] >> 16 );   

    return hash;             
 }         
#endif // !DARWIN            

int main()
{

  printf("Machine: %s\n", getMachineName());
  printf("CPU: %d\n", getCpuHash());
  printf("Volume: %d\n", getVolumeHash());
  return 0;
}    
share|improve this answer
1  
One good thing about this code is that it takes into account the common case where a user has multiple NICs, each with a different MAC address. – Cody Gray May 31 '13 at 14:29
    
... that's a little more complicated than I imagined it :-) – cube May 31 '13 at 14:37
    
Well, I can easily change the mac address via terminal (ifconfig eth0 hw ether ...), CPUID is not unique but shared by all processors of the same model, machine name can easily be changed as well. This "uniqueness" can be faked easily. – Alex Petrenko Oct 15 '14 at 10:44
    
Is it ok to start insulting right away? That is what is voting for. In my opinion the answer is not perfect and can be improved in many ways. E.g. why do you use only first level of CPU ID which only includes vendor identifier? Why not use feature bits, family, etc.? Also code for MAC address obtaining does not compile in Ubuntu 14 (not to mention that it is messy and difficult to read). In linux environments there's also a funtion __get_cpuid which one can use to get rid of this asm stuff. – Alex Petrenko Oct 15 '14 at 17:38
    
Do not understand me incorrectly, I appreciate your effort. Maybe your code was a good reference point for other people. Well, anyway now I cannot vote up until you edit the answer. Sorry if this hurts you too much – Alex Petrenko Oct 15 '14 at 17:43

/proc/cpuinfo and /proc/meminfo can be easily read like normal files: just use open() and read() in your C/C++ program.

Moreover, instead of md5, think about using SHA, which is provided by libssl-dev:

#include <openssl/sha.h>

/* Result of SHA hashing: */
char sha [SHA_DIGEST_LENGTH];

/* Null-terminated buffer that must be hashed: */
char* buffer = ...

SHA1((unsigned char*) buffer, strlen(buffer), (unsigned char* ) sha);

Finally, link with -lssl.

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1  
That's not what he asked – Salgar May 31 '13 at 13:52
    
The first part of the answer, yes, it is what he asked. – Claudio May 31 '13 at 14:24
    
I don't think whole /proc/meminfo can be used for unique IDs - its contents are changed as the memory usage changes. – zserge Oct 15 '14 at 19:34

Maybe you can generate almost unique id from unique hardware ids - MAC is universally unique, you can also use cpu model

In my opinion you should pick only those things which may not be changed frequently like cpu or LAN/WLAN cards.

share|improve this answer
    
If he uses /proc/cpuinfo he already uses the CPU model. – Claudio May 31 '13 at 14:26
    
You hint at the problem in your answer: LAN/WLAN cards. Lots of machines have multiple network cards, in particular notebooks that have both wireless and wired cards. Those will each have different MAC addresses. Which one are you going to check? And what if the user disables that one and is using the other one? – Cody Gray May 31 '13 at 14:28
    
@claudio: not on windows he doesn't. – Rafael Baptista May 31 '13 at 14:29
    
@cody: get them all and create a hash out of them. – Rafael Baptista May 31 '13 at 14:29
    
@rafael Yeah, I just noticed that the code you posted in your answer does that. That's a good idea, I like it. You just have to make sure that whatever enumeration function you call will still give you disabled NICs. I can't recall if GetAdaptersInfo on Windows does that or not. Lots of Windows functions completely ignore disabled network devices, and that could be a problem for mobile users. – Cody Gray May 31 '13 at 14:31

One quite portable solution would be to use modification time of a current executable. stat function is available on unix and windows, although API is different so you would need to use some IFDEFs.

A binary is unlikely to be deployed at the exactly same time to different machines, so the ids should be unique. The drawback is that the binary update will change the ids.

share|improve this answer
    
If that was all that was needed, it could generate a guid, either locally - through an OS api, or with a server call to a guid generator. – Rafael Baptista May 31 '13 at 15:35
    
@RafaelBaptista But uuid would not survive a system restart and a server component complicates a solution. But actually random uuid written to a file (if missing) is a very good solution. Very portable and with practically 0 probability of generating a duplicate. – Jan Wrobel May 31 '13 at 15:39

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