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i'm trying to program a Windows Runtime Component in C# in Visual Studio 2012 for Windows 8. I have some issues by using Json.NET to deserialize a JSON like this:

{
"header": {
    "id": 0,
    "code": 0,
    "hits": 10
},
"body": {
    "datalist": [
        {
            "name": "",
            "city": "",
            "age": 0
        },
        {
            "name": "",
            "city": "",
            "age": 0
        },
        {
            "name": "",
            "city": "",
            "age": 0
        }
    ]
}
}

My intention is to get a top-level Dictionary out of this and to interpret every value as a string. For this example you would get a dictionary with two keys (header and body) and the matching values as strings. After this you could go down the tree. A function like this

Dictionary<string, string> jsonDict =
            JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, string>>(json);

would be nice, but this one only accept string-values. Do anybody knows how to ignore the types or get it on another way?

Furthermore to get out of the body-value "{"datalist": [ { "name": "", ....}]}" a list of dictionaries.

Thanks in advance!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would use this site and deserialize as

var myObj =JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<RootObject>(json);

public class Header
{
    public int id { get; set; }
    public int code { get; set; }
    public int hits { get; set; }
}

public class Datalist
{
    public string name { get; set; }
    public string city { get; set; }
    public int age { get; set; }
}

public class Body
{
    public List<Datalist> datalist { get; set; }
}

public class RootObject
{
    public Header header { get; set; }
    public Body body { get; set; }
}

You can also use dynamic keyword without declaring any classes

dynamic myObj =JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(json);

var age = myObj.body.datalist[1].age;

And since JObject implements IDictionary<> this is also possible

var jsonDict = JObject.Parse(json);  
var age = jsonDict["body"]["datalist"][1]["age"];
share|improve this answer
    
Ah ok, i prefer the dynamic way, because i dont want to create classes in advance. But do you see a possibility to get a list of dictionaries out of that? I ask because to exchange data from the WinRT Component in C# to (in my case) JavaScript, there are only a handful of types like IList/IDictionary etc. The full list is shown here: link And in JS i bind the datalist(WinJS.Binding.List) and connect the dataSource to my View. So i need a Dictionary or the json. Any ideas? –  tvelop May 31 '13 at 16:26
    
@tvelop JObject already implements IDictionary, so you can use it like a dictionary. var jsonDict = JObject.Parse(json); var age = jsonDict["body"]["datalist"][1]["age"]; –  I4V May 31 '13 at 16:37
    
Ok in C# i can use it like one but i cannot transfer the JObject as an IDictionary type into my JS part. Do you know a solution without creating an IDictionary element by element? Finally i want to get the json from C# to my JavaScript part. Nice would be a Dictionary with in this case two strings(header, body) or another idea to map the json over keys dynamically. –  tvelop Jun 3 '13 at 10:51
    
Sorry for spam, but maybe its better explained this way: The program should pars the json in c# and transfer it to javascript by using one of the given winrt types(see link above). And it should work dynamically without explicit classes. So my idea was to use the Dictionary to map only the top level keys like header and body in this case and interpret the values regardless the type as string or sth i could use in JS without parsing again. –  tvelop Jun 3 '13 at 12:32
    
var myObj =JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<RootObject>(json); what is "json" in this line? –  Mihir Apr 26 '14 at 5:30

If you're having a problem defining your classes, a nice feature in VS 2012 allows you to generate classes to hold your JSON/XML data using the Paste Special command under Edit. For instance, your JSON created this class:

public class Rootobject
{
    public Header header { get; set; }
    public Body body { get; set; }
}

public class Header
{
    public int id { get; set; }
    public int code { get; set; }
    public int hits { get; set; }
}

public class Body
{
    public Datalist[] datalist { get; set; }
}

public class Datalist
{
    public string name { get; set; }
    public string city { get; set; }
    public int age { get; set; }
}

...which you could then deserialize your request into the type of RootObject, e.g.

var obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<RootObject>(json);
share|improve this answer
    
var obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<RootObject>(json); what is json here??? –  Mihir Apr 24 '14 at 11:08

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