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For example, ParsecT has multiple type variables in its definition.

newtype ParsecT s u m a
    = ParsecT {unParser :: forall b .
                 State s u
              -> (a -> State s u -> ParseError -> m b) 
              -> (ParseError -> m b)                   
              -> (a -> State s u -> ParseError -> m b) 
              -> (ParseError -> m b)                   
              -> m b
             } 

Can we do it like this ?

newtype ParsecT m a s u     -- Only the order of s u m a is changed to m a s u.
    = ParsecT {unParser :: forall b .
                 State s u
              -> (a -> State s u -> ParseError -> m b) 
              -> (ParseError -> m b)                   
              -> (a -> State s u -> ParseError -> m b) 
              -> (ParseError -> m b)                   
              -> m b
             }

I am wondering whether there is a rule or principle about the order of type variables when we define a newtype.

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A similar question at the value level is here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5863128/… –  cheecheeo May 31 '13 at 16:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

In this case, a is last because we want ParsecT s u m __ to be a monad, that way, what our parsers look for can depend on what they found before, and so forth. If u came last we couldn't write

 instance Monad m => Monad (ParsecT s u m) where ...

m is next-to-last because we want ParsecT s u to be a 'monad transformer'

 class MonadTrans t where 
     lift :: m a -> t m a 

 instance MonadTrans (ParsecT s u) where ...

If we put the m first, this instance wouldn't be possible. There doesn't seem to be any similar reason for the ordering of s and u.

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1  
Worth bringing up that newtype is sometimes used purely to manipulate the order of the type indices so that you can provide instances for Functor and Monad on multiple typed holes. –  J. Abrahamson Jun 1 '13 at 1:57
    
@applicative, thank you. I see now. I've tried but it is actually impossible to alter the order and preserve the original class-instance structure. –  Znatz Jun 3 '13 at 13:38

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