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When I try to compile my simple starter program, I get the following error:

In file included from processcommand.c:1:
processcommand.h:5: error: expected '=', ',', ';', 'asm' or '__attribute__' before '*' token  
processcommand.c:3: error: conflicting types for 'getinput'  
processcommand.h:3: error: previous declaration of 'getinput' was here  
processcommand.c: In function 'getinput':  
processcommand.c:8: warning: return makes integer from pointer without a cast  
processcommand.c: At top level:  
processcommand.c:12: error: conflicting types for 'printoutput'  
processcommand.h:4: error: previous declaration of 'printoutput' was here  

My code files are: main.c

#include "main.h"

int main() {
    float version = 0.2;
    printf("Qwesomeness Command Interprepter version %f by Zeb McCorkle starting...\n", version);
    printf("%s", getcommand());
}

main.h

#include "includes.h"
int main();

includes.h

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

processcommand.c

#include "processcommand.h"
getinput() {
    char *output;
    printf(" ");
    scanf("%s", output);
    return output;
}

printoutput(char *input) {
    printf("%s", input);
    return 0;
}

getcommand() {
    printoutput("Command:");
    return getinput();
}

processcommand.h

#include "includes.h"
char *getinput();
unsigned char printoutput(char *input);
char *getcommand();

I believe that those are all of my source files. I compiled with

gcc main.c processcommand.c

Thank you for reading this.

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1  
Your function declaration does not match your function definition. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '13 at 15:31
    
are you sure this is really all your code? The error in processcommand.h is of the kind that "shouldn't happen". There's nothing in the code you posted that could cause that. What is line 5 of processcommand.h ? –  Medinoc May 31 '13 at 15:33
    
@mypal125: Why did you omit return types and parameter lists in your function definitions? Note, BTW, that parameter-less functions in C are declared with (void) parameters, not as simple (). –  AndreyT May 31 '13 at 15:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

the default return type is int, so getinput() means int getinput()

try changing:

#include "processcommand.h"
getinput() {
char *output;
printf(" ");
scanf("%s", output);
return output;
}
printoutput(char *input) {
printf("%s", input);
return 0;
}
getcommand() {
printoutput("Command:");
return getinput();
}

to

#include "processcommand.h"
char *getinput() {
char *output;
printf(" ");
scanf("%s", output);
return output;
}
unsigned char printoutput(char *input) {
printf("%s", input);
return 0;
}
char *getcommand() {
printoutput("Command:");
return getinput();
}
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facepalm Thanks for the answer. This is the one that makes the most sense to me. –  mypal125 Jul 14 '13 at 12:24

In processcommand.c, it says

getinput()

what is an abbreviation of

int getinput()

which is a function with unspecified parameters and an int return value.

In processcommand.h, however, you have

char *getinput()

which is a function with unspecified parameters and a char * return value.

What you probably want on both places is

char *getinput(void)

which is a function with no parameters and a char * return value.

printoutput and getcommand have the same problem.

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The following errors starting with:

error: conflicting types for ...

Are due to the fact that you are not implementing the functions as you declared them, for example you declare:

char *getinput();

but implement like so:

getinput() {
char *output;
printf(" ");
scanf("%s", output);
return output;
}

Which will assume a return value of int. If you modify your implementation like so:

char *getinput() {
...

it should fix that error. Unrelated to that error you need to allocate memory for output in getinput:

char *output = malloc(...); // 

otherwise you are writing to an uninitialized pointer.

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