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I have the following piece of code, and on some point i want to init

the object with range of rows and columns.

When i print both of them, i get a number for each, meaning as far as i understand

it should work on the range method.

Here is the code:

class Board(object):
    def __init__(self, rows, columns):

        #small values
        if rows < 1 or columns < 2:
            SizeOutOfBoundException

        #large values
        if rows > 20 or columns > 50:
            SizeOutOfBoundException

        self.rows = rows;
        self.columns = columns; 
        self.arr = [[[0,'H'] for x in range(self.rows)] for y in range(self.columns)] # <- ERROR

But this is the error i keep getting:

self.arr = [[[0,'H'] for x in range(self.rows)] for y in range(self.columns)] 
TypeError: range() integer end argument expected, got Board.

How can i manipulate it to work? and why does this wont work?

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closed as too localized by Itzik984, Flexo May 31 '13 at 16:45

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Can you clarify what you are doing to call it and what the output should be? –  Triclops200 May 31 '13 at 15:49
    
I am just trying to init my board with the [0,H] list on each location... –  Itzik984 May 31 '13 at 15:50
3  
Note that your SizeOutOfBoundException lines are no-ops; they do nothing. Use raise SizeOutOfBoundException() if you actually wanted to raise an exception there. –  Martijn Pieters May 31 '13 at 15:53
2  
Another tip: Python doesn't need to use ; colons. Please do remove them. –  Martijn Pieters May 31 '13 at 15:54
    
You also don't need the trailing semicolons after the lines self.rows = rows; and self.columns = columns; –  Tom Dalton May 31 '13 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

You are most likely passing a Board object as rows or columns, rather than an integer.

Printing:

self.rows
self.columns
type(self.rows)
type(self.columns)

just before the line causing an error would help to confirm this, alternatively can you post the code you're using that calls Board(rows,columns)?

share|improve this answer
    
As i stated, i do print the rows and columns... and i get a number –  Itzik984 May 31 '13 at 15:56
    
Can you print the type of rows and columns too? –  Tom Dalton May 31 '13 at 15:57
    
When i print the type i get: 4 <__m –  Itzik984 May 31 '13 at 15:59
    
>>> type(4) <type 'int'> Not sure your response is complete? –  Tom Dalton May 31 '13 at 16:04
    
<type 'int'> This is what i get –  Itzik984 May 31 '13 at 16:06

This works for me. Are you sure the problem is not with indenting may be ? Your constructor is not indented correctly.

class Board(object):

    def __init__(self, rows, columns):

        #small values
        if rows < 1 or columns < 2:
            raise SizeOutOfBoundException

        #large values
        if rows > 20 or columns > 50:
            raise SizeOutOfBoundException

        self.rows = rows
        self.columns = columns
        self.arr = [[[0,'H'] for x in range(self.rows)] for y in range(self.columns)]

myboard = Board(3,4)
print myboard.arr

The output is:

[[[0, 'H'], [0, 'H'], [0, 'H']], [[0, 'H'], [0, 'H'], [0, 'H']], [[0, 'H'], [0, 'H'], [0, 'H']], [[0, 'H'], [0, 'H'], [0, 'H']]]

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There's nothing wrong with your code.

Are you instantiating the class?

b = Board(10, 10)
print b.arr
share|improve this answer
    
i do init it, sending numbers, and still the same error –  Itzik984 May 31 '13 at 16:02

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