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I'm currently using MySQL and iMagick to create a gallery of images. Each image is uploaded, gets run through imageMagick, and then has the filename and extension stored in a MySQL DB with the format PID, filename, extension. I can iterate through the DB to print out all the images to the page fine with the code below:

$gallerySQL = mysqli_query($connection, "SELECT * FROM gallery");
while($row = mysqli_fetch_array($gallerySQL)){
    $file = $row['filename'].$row['ext'];
    $thumb = $row['filename']."-thumb.png";
    $blur = $row['filename']."-thumbB.png";
    ?>
    <a href="<?php echo $file ?>"><img src="<?php echo $thumb ?>" onmouseover="this.src='<?php echo $blur ?>'" onmouseout="this.src='<?php echo $thumb ?>'" alt="Loaded from DB" /></a>
    <?php
}
?>

However, I am unsure how to implement memcached into this. The image gallery doesn't change very frequently, so it seems like a good candidate for caching rather than taking multiple DB hits every time the page loads. The code I've written to do this is:

$num = 0;
$key = "img_".$num;
$pics = mysqli_query($connection, "SELECT * FROM gallery");

while($num<4){
while($row = mysqli_fetch_array($pics)){
    $key = "img_".$num;
    if(!$mem->get($key)){

        $file = $row['filename'].$row['ext'];
        $thumb = $row['filename']."-thumb.png";
        $blur = $row['filename']."-thumbB.png";
        ?>
        <a href="<?php echo $file; ?>"><img src="<?php echo $thumb ?>" onmouseover="this.src='<?php echo $blur ?>'" onmouseout="this.src='<?php echo $thumb ?>'" alt="Loaded from DB" /></a>
        <?php

        $key = "img_".$num;
        $mem->add($key, $row['filename']);  

        $key = "ext_".$num;
        $mem->add($key, $row['ext']);

    } else {
        $key = "img_".$num;
        $file = $mem->get($key);
        $key = "ext_".$num;
        $ext = $mem->get($key);
        ?>
        <a href="<?php echo $file.$ext; ?>"><img src="<?php echo $file."-thumb.png" ?>" onmouseover="this.src='<?php echo $file."-thumbB.png" ?>'" onmouseout="this.src='<?php echo $file."-thumb.png" ?>'" alt="Loaded from MemCached" /></a>
        <?php
    }
    $num++;
} // end while(row)
}// end while(num)
?>

This works fine, or so it seems, but I can't find many tutorials on MemCached (most seem to be on MemCache) so I'm not sure if I'm going about this the right way or if I'm using the tools completely in the wrong fashion. What is the best way to keep track of how high the keys should go? At the moment I've hard-coded in four because I know that's how many images it has to load, but obviously that isn't the right solution.

If I could get some critique on my usage, and possibly a link to some recommended tutorials, that would be great! I feel like I'm hacking together a way of making this work, the memcached version of using tables to lay out your webpage.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Cache usage is very simple:

  1. check the cache to find an item
  2. if not present, fetch (or create) it and put it into the cache
  3. deliver the item

You can think of three ways to fill a cache and you'll choose a strategy depending on the data being cached (how much data, how long does it take to find/prepare the data, how often it is used, how "well" it can be cached).

  • fetch one item at a time
  • fetch multiple items at a time
  • fetch all items at a time

The first strategy is for when the creation of the data takes a fair amount of time and the data is "well" cacheable (can be kept for a reasonable time in cache). The creation of the cache entry might take a longer time, subsequent calls will find the data in the cache and will be very fast.

The second strategy is for when you have a lot of cacheable records and can determine a subset in resaonable time and the data will not change frequently ("well cacheable"). This strategy can also be used for prefetching presumeable items, like "fetch this ID and the following 10, because they might be used in a couple of moments".

The third strategy is useful if you have only a small amount of items, but they're accessed very often. You take a lot of load off the database this way (imagine the data is used 1000 times per minute, caching for just one minte reduces the amount of queries to 1 instead of 1000). Whenever a item is missing from the cache, refresh the whole thing.

To take it down to your case, I'd recommend strategy 3.

You check the cache for the desired item. If it's not present, get the whole list of records and put everything into the cache, using a unique key for every item (and don't forget to remember to pick out the requested item). On subsequent lookups, every single record should be found and served from the cache.

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