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I have a missing row in a data table which describes a function from time, sid, and s.c to count:

> dates.dt[1001:1011]
        sid   s.c  count                time
 1: missing CLICK 104192 2013-05-25 10:00:00
 2: missing SHARE   7694 2013-05-25 10:00:00
 3: present CLICK  99573 2013-05-25 10:00:00
 4: present SHARE  89302 2013-05-25 10:00:00
 5: missing CLICK     28 2013-05-25 11:00:00
 6: present CLICK     25 2013-05-25 11:00:00
 7: present SHARE     15 2013-05-25 11:00:00
 8: missing CLICK 104544 2013-05-25 12:00:00
 9: missing SHARE   7253 2013-05-25 12:00:00
10: present CLICK 105891 2013-05-25 12:00:00
11: present SHARE  88709 2013-05-25 12:00:00

the missing row is (I expect a row for each of the two values of the 1st and 2nd columns and each time slice):

    missing SHARE      0 2013-05-25 11:00:00

How do I detect and restore such missing rows?

The way I discovered this was

library(data.table)
total <- dates.dt[, list(sum(count)) , keyby="time"]
setnames(total,"V1","total")
ts <- dates.dt[s.c=="SHARE" & sid=="missing", list(sum(count)) , keyby="time"]
cat("SHARE/missing:",nrow(ts),"rows\n")
stopifnot(identical(total$time,ts$time)) # --> ERROR!
total$shares.missing <- ts$V1

Now, I guess I can find the first place where ts$time and total$time differ and insert a 0 row there, but this seems like a rather tedious process.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
"the missing row is, obviously" - haha, wat? I think you need to elaborate a little on what different types of omissions you expect to have –  eddi May 31 '13 at 17:48
1  
Something like: rbind on cbind(expand.grid(unique(dt$sid),unique(dt$s.c),unique(dt$time)),0) and then setkey(dt,...) to put the inserts in the right places. –  Frank May 31 '13 at 18:00
    
@Frank: thanks for expand.grid! how do I find which rows are present in its return value but absent from my original data table? –  sds May 31 '13 at 18:40
    
Ah, good question. I'm not sure. You could make a sort of key column mykey:=paste(sid,s.c,time,sep="") in both the original data set and the expand.grid and then compare the setdiff of that column. –  Frank May 31 '13 at 18:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Following @Frank's suggestion you can do:

setkey(dt, time, sid, s.c)
dt[J(expand.grid(unique(time),unique(sid),unique(s.c)))][order(time, sid, s.c)]
#                   time     sid   s.c  count
# 1: 2013-05-25 10:00:00 missing CLICK 104192
# 2: 2013-05-25 10:00:00 missing SHARE   7694
# 3: 2013-05-25 10:00:00 present CLICK  99573
# 4: 2013-05-25 10:00:00 present SHARE  89302
# 5: 2013-05-25 11:00:00 missing CLICK     28
# 6: 2013-05-25 11:00:00 missing SHARE     NA
# 7: 2013-05-25 11:00:00 present CLICK     25
# 8: 2013-05-25 11:00:00 present SHARE     15
# 9: 2013-05-25 12:00:00 missing CLICK 104544
#10: 2013-05-25 12:00:00 missing SHARE   7253
#11: 2013-05-25 12:00:00 present CLICK 105891
#12: 2013-05-25 12:00:00 present SHARE  88709
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's a good way of doing it. There must be some shorter way of writing the argument to J(), though...? Also, why order ad the end; isn't the Join still sorted? –  Frank May 31 '13 at 19:03
1  
not sure about a shorter way, and yeah, it becomes sorted by s.c (first, then sid, then time) after the join, not really sure why –  eddi May 31 '13 at 19:06
1  
ah, duh, it's sorted in the same order as the expand.grid, as a join should be –  eddi May 31 '13 at 19:12

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