Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what is a##b & #a?

  #define f(a,b) a##b
  #define g(a)   #a
  #define h(a) g(a)

  main()
  {
          printf("%s\n",h(f(1,2)));  //how should I interpret this?? [line 1]
          printf("%s\n",g(f(1,2)));  //and this? [line 2]
  }

How does this program work?


the output is

12
f(1, 2)


now I understand how a##b & #a work. But why is the result different in the two cases (line 1 and line 2)?

share|improve this question
3  
What happens when you run that program? Doing that should help you understand what is happening. –  Greg Hewgill Nov 6 '09 at 9:02
1  
Really, playing a while with that code will shed light. And if you have specific questions fell free to ask them here. –  sharptooth Nov 6 '09 at 9:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The ## concatenates two tokens together. It can only be used in the preprocessor.

f(1,2) becomes 1 ## 2 becomes 12.

The # operator by itself stringifies tokens: #a becomes "a". Therefore, g(f(1,2)) becomes "f(1,2)" when the preprocessor is done with it.

h(f(1,2)) is effectively #(1 ## 2) which becomes #12 which becomes "12" as the preprocessor runs over it.

share|improve this answer

a##b will paste the code togather.

so f(1,2) will become 12

share|improve this answer
2  
That is only half of the problem. –  user181548 Nov 6 '09 at 9:06

a##b is the string contatenation of the literals a and b, so f(1,2) is "12"

#a is the string literal a, so g(3) is "3"

share|improve this answer

The f(a,b) macro concatenates its arguments, g(a) turns its arguments to a string and h(a) is helper macro for g(a). I think it will output:

12
f(1,2)

The reason is that the h(a) macro causes its argument to be full expanded before passing it to g(a) while g(a) will take its arguments literally without expanding them first.

share|improve this answer
    
why does the second printf end up in "f(1,2)" instead of "12"? –  Moeb Nov 6 '09 at 9:11
    
why does this happen: "The reason is that the h(a) macro causes its argument to be full expanded before passing it to g(a) while g(a) will take its arguments literally without expanding them first."? –  Moeb Nov 6 '09 at 9:13

## is the macro concatenation operator. So for example f(foo,bar) would be equivalent to foobar.

share|improve this answer

For questions like these (and also more "real-world" problems having to do with the preprocessor), I find it very helpful to actually read the code, after it has been preprocessed.

How to do this varies with the compiler, but with gcc, you would use this:

$ gcc -E test.c

(snip)
main()
{
        printf("%s\n","12");
        printf("%s\n","f(1,2)");
}

So, you can see that the symbols have been both concatenated, and turned into a string.

share|improve this answer
    
why does the second printf end up in "f(1,2)" instead of "12"? –  Moeb Nov 6 '09 at 9:11
    
@hanifr: Because the g() macro stringifies its argument, I guess. –  unwind Nov 6 '09 at 9:22
  #define f(a,b) a##b
  #define g(a)   #a
  #define h(a) g(a)

So, ## combine 2 parts directly together, no matter what types they are... Give you a example.. printf("%d\n",f(1,2)); you get 12, that means here f(1,2) is 12 a integer.

    int a2 = 100;
    printf("%d\n",f(a,2));

here f(a,2) is label. it points to a label in your code context, if there is not int a2 = 100, you get compile errors. And #a turns whatever a is , into a string... And then h(a) g(a) It's very strange.. It looks that when you call h(a), it turns to g(a), and passes a into g(a), firstly, it interprets what a is. so, before you can g(a), a is transformed to f(a,b) = a##b = 12

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.