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I thought you used to be able to do this in "strict" mode, but I may be remembering incorrectly. Is is possible for something like this to work...

use strict;
use warnings;

package SomePackage;

my $TargetPID="demo:5"; #using "our" also works, but not in strict mode
my $VarName="TargetPID";

print ${$VarName}; #works but not in strict or if the var is declared with "my"
exit;

The reason I'm interested is that I'm trying to select a variable based on a text flag in a text file and I'd like to read in the content of the text file into a hash, then substitute some identifier along the lines of "#TargetPID#" with the corresponding variable. Being also able to specify both a package and a variable (or constant) would be a nice tbonus.

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4  
You can always create a hash of varnames as keys and substitutions as values –  fge May 31 '13 at 18:15
1  
If you are willing to use eval, use can eval '$' . $VarName –  dg123 May 31 '13 at 18:27
1  
This is a bad data design. Use data structures. That's what they're for. –  Jack Maney May 31 '13 at 19:19
2  
@RickSarvas: this is exactly the main case that use strict 'refs' is intended to prevent. If you want to access the data by name, put it in a hash; it isn't "end[ing] up having to do that", it's what you should be doing. –  ysth May 31 '13 at 20:49
1  
Use a hash. That's why they're there. –  Andy Lester May 31 '13 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I can't think of any advantage of doing it the way you are trying to over just using a hash:

use strict;
use warnings;

package SomePackage;

my %vars = ();
$vars{'TargetPID'}="demo:5";
my $VarName="TargetPID";

print $vars{$VarName};
exit;

If you really must use $TargetPID as a variable and not a member of a hash, you can use eval:

my $TargetPID = "demo:5";
my $VarName = '$TargetPID';
print eval $VarName;

Or, if for some reason you need the value of $VarName to be 'TargetPID' and not '$TargetPID', you can do print eval '$' . $VarName.

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To some extent I'm trying to do that, but I figured there's be a way to that with the existing vars as they are currently defined. Something along the lines of "$SomePackage::{$VarName}" without having to specially define a hash. I suppose I expected that one of the more unusual Perl internal vars would already contain the complete list of vars defined in a similar way that "%ENV" does. –  Rick Sarvas May 31 '13 at 18:33
    
Ok, I've added an alternative that you might find more palatable. –  Lorkenpeist May 31 '13 at 18:44
    
@RickSarvas Just curious, which solution did you end up using? –  Lorkenpeist May 31 '13 at 18:58
    
I started using the eval option and initially it worked great, but when I applied the changes to the SOAP service code I found it doesn't work quite the same (returns nothing). The structure is not quite the same and the code I'm initiating via a SOAP call is in a sub, so it looks like I need to use another approach, like a globally defined hash. –  Rick Sarvas May 31 '13 at 20:37

You can use the PadWalker module for this. From the documentation:

PadWalker is a module which allows you to inspect (and even change!) lexical variables in any subroutine which called you. It will only show those variables which are in scope at the point of the call.

In your case, you would need to use peek_my, which does what it says: it allows you to peek into variables declared by my in a given scope.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

package SomePackage;
use PadWalker qw/peek_my/;

my $TargetPID = "demo:5";
my $VarName = "TargetPID";

print ${peek_my(0)->{'$' . $VarName}}

The subroutine peek_my takes one argument, a level, which is the number of subroutine calls to go back on the stack. It then returns a hash map of all the lexical my variables that were in scope at the time of the given call. In your case, the variable you want is defined in the same scope as where it is needed, so you would pass in 0, to go back 0 subroutine calls. Then you pull out the data you need like any other hash ref.

Be careful though, from the documentation:

PadWalker is particularly useful for debugging (emphasis mine.) It's even used by Perl's built-in debugger. (It can also be used for evil, of course.)

I wouldn't recommend using PadWalker directly in production code, but it's your call. Some of the modules that use PadWalker internally are certainly safe for and useful in production.

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