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I need to evaluate a string so i can assign a value to a class variable :

Class :

class DATACLASS {
public:
    double variable1, variable2, variable3;
};

The void init() :

void init() 
{
    DATACLASS *d = new DATACLASS;
    std::string ssList[3] = {"variable1", 
                             "variable2", 
                             "variable3"};                        
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
    {
      std::stringstream ss;
      ss << ssList[i];
      //ss.str().c_str() correspond to "variable1", "variable2", "variable3"
      mxArray *array_ptr = mexGetVariable("base", ss.str().c_str());
      double pr = (double)mxGetPr(array_ptr)[0];
      // How to make the same thing here?
      // I would like to have something that would evaluate
      // data->ssList[i] = pr;
      // or more precisely      
      // data->variable1 = pr;
      // but from the ss string like below (but this doesn't work)
      data->ss.str().c_str() = pr;
    }

I get this kind of error when trying to do it this way :

error C2039: 'ss' : is not a member of 'DATACLASS'
share|improve this question
    
This is called reflection, if you want to google for it. Short answer: you can't do that in C++. Use another language, or review your design. –  Alexandre C. May 31 '13 at 18:39
    
There's no built-in support for this in C++ like there is in JavaScript. Some people have tried to build reflection frameworks which you might be able to use, but I've never tested any. You'll have to fake it yourself if you really want this sort of thing. –  jerry May 31 '13 at 18:40
    
@AlexandreC. That's good to know there is term for what i'm trying to do. I really didn't know what to look for. It appears I'll have to review my design. –  m_power May 31 '13 at 18:53

3 Answers 3

That is not valid C++. What the compiler thinks that you are trying to do is access a member of an instance of DATACLASS called ss and call some methods on it.

What you are trying to do can be done in reflection, which is not supported in C++. You can half-ass it by using some form of pseudo-reflection model using templates.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have any example of a pseudo-reflection code? –  m_power May 31 '13 at 18:54
    
It could be as simple as having a map (list of key-value pairs) if you know all the fields are going to be the same type and then indexing it with ss.str(). I suggest that you do not go down the rabbit-hole of trying to use template magic or other pseudo-reflection unless you are fairly confident in your C++ abilities. –  Mohammed Hossain May 31 '13 at 18:58

Are you only reading doubles? You could use pointers to data members for this.

    std::map<std::string, double DATACLASS::*> aMembers;
    aMembers["variable1"] = &DATACLASS::variable1;
    aMembers["variable2"] = &DATACLASS::variable2;
    aMembers["variable3"] = &DATACLASS::variable3;

    DATACLASS dc;
    std::string sData = "variable1";
    dc.*aMembers[sData] = 10;

In a full solution you would of course have to check that aMembers[sData] exists first. If you need to support multiple data types, you would need to use templates and write some support classes. It should be doable, though.

share|improve this answer

The closest you'll reasonably come without a huge amount of effort is something like the following. You could abstract away some things using macros, functions, containers, templates, pointers/references, etc., but this is the basic gist. I wouldn't suggest doing this and committing the time to it unless you have a compelling reason. What is your end goal?

class DATACLASS {
public:
    double variable1, variable2, variable3;
};

void init() 
{
    DATACLASS *d = new DATACLASS;
    std::string ssList[3] = {"variable1", 
                             "variable2", 
                             "variable3"};                        
    for(unsigned i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
    {
      std::stringstream ss;
      ss << ssList[i];
      //ss.str().c_str() correspond to "variable1", "variable2", "variable3"
      mxArray *array_ptr = mexGetVariable("base", ss.str().c_str());
      double pr = (double)mxGetPr(array_ptr)[0];
      if(ss.str() == "variable1")
        data->variable1 = pr;
      else if(ss.str() == "variable2")
        data->variable2 = pr;
      else if(ss.str() == "variable3")
        data->variable3 = pr;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's the way it was coded before adding a for loop. Because there could be a huge amount of variable, i'm trying to avoid the use of if else if. –  m_power May 31 '13 at 19:02
    
@m_power I unsderstand. Let me see if I can come up with something else for you, then. It would be easier if the values were always compile-time constants, but then it'd be a less interesting question :) –  jerry May 31 '13 at 19:08
    
@m_power are you trying to avoid if statements due to runtime concerns (speed, code size) or development concerns (amount of repetitive typing, risk of mistakes, maintainability nightmare)? –  jerry May 31 '13 at 19:28
    
for simplifying the code and for portability. But at the start, i didn't know that reflection was not possible in cpp. So i might end using if statements if there are no alternatives. –  m_power May 31 '13 at 19:37

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