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I wanted to create a simple auxiliary algorithm that would fill a container, such as std::vector<T>, with a geometric progression (the first term is a, and the n-th term is given by a * pow(r, n-1), where r is a given ratio); I created the following code:

#include<vector>
#include<algorithm>
#include<iostream>

template<template <typename> class Container, typename T>
void progression(Container<T>& container, T a, T ratio, size_t N) {
  if(N > 0) {    
    T factor = T(1);  
    for(size_t k=0; k<N; k++) {
      container.push_back(a * factor);
      factor *= ratio;
    }
  }
}

int main() {
  std::vector<double> r;
  progression(r, 10.0, 0.8, static_cast<size_t>(10));

  for(auto item : r) {
    std::cout<<item<<std::endl;
  }

  return 0;
}

which yields the following errors upon attempting compilation:

$ g++ geometric.cpp -std=c++11 # GCC 4.7.2 on OS X 10.7.4
geometric.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
geometric.cpp:18:52: error: no matching function for call to ‘progression(std::vector<double>&, double, double, size_t)’
geometric.cpp:18:52: note: candidate is:
geometric.cpp:6:6: note: template<template<class> class Container, class T> void progression(Container<T>&, T, T, size_t)
geometric.cpp:6:6: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
geometric.cpp:18:52: error: wrong number of template arguments (2, should be 1)
geometric.cpp:5:36: error: provided for ‘template<class> class Container’

Clang's error message is more subtle:

$ clang++ geometric.cpp -std=c++11 # clang 3.2 on OS X 10.7.4 
geometric.cpp:18:3: error: no matching function for call to 'progression'
  progression(r, 10, 0.8, 10);
  ^~~~~~~~~~~
geometric.cpp:6:6: note: candidate template ignored: failed template argument deduction
void progression(Container<T>& container, T a, T ratio, size_t N) {
     ^
1 error generated.

I would have expected that using template template parameters I would be able to deduce not only the container, but also the container's value_type (T in this case).

So, the question is: how can I create a generic function which will be able to deduce both the container type and the value type?

I am sure I'm missing something obvious - I appreciate your patience and help.

Edit (Answer)

The following code behaves as expected:

#include<vector>
#include<algorithm>
#include<iostream>

template<template <typename...> class Container, typename T, typename... Args>
void progression(Container<Args...>& container, T a, T ratio, size_t N) {
  if(N > 0) {    
    T factor = T(1);  
    for(size_t k=0; k<N; k++) {
      container.push_back(a * factor);
      factor *= ratio;
    }
  }
}

int main() {
  std::vector<double> r;
  progression(r, 10.0, 0.8, 10);

  for(auto item : r) {
    std::cout<<item<<std::endl;
  }

  return 0;
}

Output:

10
8
6.4
5.12
4.096
3.2768
2.62144
2.09715
1.67772
1.34218
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first problem is, that you are forgetting that std::vector<> is a class template accepting two template parameters (the element type and the allocator), not one. The fact that the second template parameter has a default value is irrelevant when you are using template template parameters:

template<template <typename, typename> class Container, typename T, typename A>
//                           ^^^^^^^^                               ^^^^^^^^^^
void progression(Container<T, A>& container, T a, T ratio, size_t N) {
//                         ^^^^
// ...
}

Notice, that this will make it impossible to pass, for instance, an instance of std::map or std::unordered_map as the first function argument. Therefore, my suggestion is to give up deducing that the first argument is the instance of a standard container (standard containers are just not that uniform):

template<typename C, typename T, typename A>
//       ^^^^^^^^^
void progression(C& container, T a, T ratio, size_t N) {
//               ^^
// ...
}

What you may want to do then is to express the compile-time constrain, perhaps through a static_assert and based on a custom type trait, that C must be an instance of a standard container.

Alternatively, you can use variadic templates as suggested by KerrekSB in his answer (but that still won't prevent you from passing in an instance of any other kind of template, even non-container ones).

The second problem is in the way you are calling your template:

progression(r, 10, 0.8, 10);

Here, the type of the second argument is int, while the type of the container element is double. This will confuse the compiler when performing type deduction. Either call it this way:

progression(r, 10.0, 0.8, 10);

Or allow your compiler to deduce a different type for the second argument (possible SFINAE-constraining it to be something that can convert to the element type).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This solves the problem. –  Escualo May 31 '13 at 19:50
    
I actually have an improved version of this answer, but my network connection went down and I cannot edit from my mobile(it's just a mess). –  Andy Prowl May 31 '13 at 19:50
    
@Arrieta: Glad it helped! –  Andy Prowl May 31 '13 at 19:51

Containers usually have a lot of template arguments. Fortunately, there's a special clause in variadic templates that lets use use a pack for any concrete number of arguments:

template <template <typename...> class Container, typename ...Args>
void foo(Container<Args...> const & c)
{
    // ...
}

(The special clause effects that this works even when Container is a non-variadic template.)

share|improve this answer
    
This is not a variadic template –  aaronman May 31 '13 at 19:30
1  
@aaronman: Never claimed it was?! –  Kerrek SB May 31 '13 at 19:31
    
I never thought about doing this. That's neat. –  chris May 31 '13 at 19:33
    
Thank you - the final implementation uses the syntax you suggest. –  Escualo May 31 '13 at 19:50

The reason this is failing is because you are saying middle two args are the same type when they are actually not. For example the middle is a float while the other is an int. Basically you are saying a and ratio are the same type but in the call they are different types

share|improve this answer
    
I think you meant that the middle is a double and that the one before it should be as well. –  chris May 31 '13 at 19:29
    
Look at my edits - this is not the problem. Even if I pass two doubles and cast the integer as size_t the problem remains. –  Escualo May 31 '13 at 19:32
    
@aaronman - it was in fact a problem - after I removed the first bug, the error you describe did show up. –  Escualo May 31 '13 at 19:36
    
@Arrieta unfortunately I can't answer the second problem can you explain the syntax of the template –  aaronman May 31 '13 at 19:38

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