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I'm having a problem with the following code displaying correctly in IE10. I'm comfortable with the fact that it won't be able to work in IE9< but according to caniuse.com ligatures (and true type) should be functioning as expected in IE10. Is there a special rule that's required to make this work?

Here's the Relevant HTML:

<body>
<nav role = "navigation" class = "nav"> 
  <ul>
  <li>
    <a href="#branches"  class="selected">home</a>
  </li>
  <li >
    <a href="#trees">mobile</a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a href="#path">portfolio</a>
 </li></li>
 <li><
   a href="#power">power</a>
 </li>
</ul> 
</nav> 

And here's the CSS:

@font-face {
  font-family: "ui";
  src: url("../fonts/Live-Share-UI.eot");
  src: url("../fonts/Live-Share-UI.svg") format("svg");
  src: url("../fonts/Live-Share-UI.ttf");
  font-feature-settings: "dlig" 1; }


.nav, .header {
  font-family: ui;
  position: fixed;
  text-align: center;
  z-index: 50;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  margin: auto auto 1em auto;
  right: 0;
  height: 1.5em; }

This is an excerpt from a larger project which can be seen at live_share_test.aws.af.cm

This is currently working with Chrome Version 27.0.1453.94 m, Opera v 12, Firefox 19.0.2 on Windows as well as a current install of Safari on iPhone 4.

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1  
IE 10 supports font-feature-settings: "dlig" 1, as you can see e.g. by testing with the Calibri font and the text “st”. Can you please specify which discretionary ligatures should be seen on your page and where? –  Jukka K. Korpela May 31 '13 at 20:21
    
The font is taken from icomoon and set up to replace the words in the Nav bar ("Home", "Mobile", "Portfolio" and "Power") with icons. These icons are each taken from the icomoon free pack. –  Crispen Smith May 31 '13 at 20:47
    
How does the font trickery relate to ligatures? –  Jukka K. Korpela May 31 '13 at 21:03
    
This is a fairly straightforward use of ligatures. We have a font called ui.ttf UI.ttf has a ligature for "home" in that ligature space is a character that is found by the text rendering engine and flushed to the screen. This is an extension of symbol fonts and is preferable because spiders can read "home" rather than reading "h". –  Crispen Smith May 31 '13 at 21:12
1  
What an awful trickery just to turn words to cryptic icons. If you used plain old img with adequate alt, you would not have created this problem and your page would work on any browser. –  Jukka K. Korpela Jun 1 '13 at 7:33
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I actually found some of the documentation on this out there a little unclear and that's what lead to the gap.

The important idea here is to have the Element using the font-face configured properly. Here's the revised declaration for .nav that works correctly (using prefix-free to add appropriate prefixing)...

(Note that I moved the fonts directory under the stylesheets directory for easier paths)

@font-face {
 font-family: 'Live-Share-UI';
 src: url("fonts/Live-Share-UI.eot");
 src: url("fonts/Live-Share-UI.eot?#iefix") format("embedded-opentype"), url("fonts/Live-Share-UI.woff") format("woff"), url("fonts/Live-Share-UI.ttf") format("truetype"), url("fonts/Live-Share-UI.svg#Live-Share-UI") format("svg");
 font-weight: normal;
 font-style: normal; }

There's also a little more descriptive work added to the font face to make it more compact, this taken directly from icomoon.

.nav, .header {
  font-family: Live-Share-UI;
  font-feature-settings: "liga","dlig";
  text-rendering: optimizeLegibility;
  font-style: normal;
  font-weight: normal;
  font-variant: normal;
  text-transform: none;
  line-height: 1;
  font-smoothing: antialiased;
  position: fixed;
  text-align: center;
  z-index: 50;
  margin: auto auto 1em auto;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  height: 1.5em; }

As a final note, I'm actually doing this in SASS and using these original code:

@mixin ui () { 
  font-family: Live-Share-UI;
  font-feature-settings:"liga","dlig";
  text-rendering:optimizeLegibility;
  font-style: normal;
  font-weight: normal;
  font-variant: normal;
  text-transform: none;
  line-height: 1;
  -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased; 
}

.nav, .header{ 
  @include ui();
  position: fixed;
  text-align: center;
  z-index: 50;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  margin: auto auto 1em auto; 
  right: 0;
  height: 1.5em; }

So, in short: Apply dlig 1 to the element, not the font face.

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Ligatures are joint letters or other shapes that replace sets of regular letters. e.g. f+f+l = ffl as one piece. Unicode advises to store the glyphs (drawings) of ligatures in the Private Use Area (PUA) of Unicode character database. They start from U+E000 and has about 6400 codepoints. You then define Glyph Substitution (GSUB) tables to define rules to replace typed letters with ligatures. You can use Microsoft's Volt program to do this.

What is a script in fonts? An OpenType compliant font (now ISO OpenFont) can have one or more scripts. Such a script is Latin used by English and Western European languages. Russian and Eastern European languages use Cyrillic. There are two kinds of ligatures: Standard and Discretionary. Any script can have STANDARD Ligatures. Most importantly, the OpenType standard says that applications should show STANDARD LIGATURES by default. All browsers except Internet Explorer complies with this specification.

Internet Explorer 10, it seems, requires the special CSS directive to turn on ligature display: font-feature-settings: 'liga' 1; <-- note the '1'. That means 'on'. Same syntax applies to 'dlig' etc. Microsoft does not seem to understand the standard they wrote. 'liga' 1 should be the default and unnecessary to specify. You use 'liga' 0 to force the program skip ligature display.

Early days (2006), the SVG-CSS3 property, 'text-rendering: geometricPrecision (or OptimizeLegibility' was used to make the browser display ligatures. Now this is not necessary to show Standard ligatures, in agreement with the font standard.

Standard ligatures help revive crippled Indic. See a web page written with a font that is practically all ligatures (This is actually Romanized Singhala. Copy text to Notepad to verify): A Singhala blog
All modern browsers on computers and smart phones show this page correctly except IE previous to version 10. The other browsers show the standard ligatures without any CSS. IE 10 requires the font-feature-setting rule.

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