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So I have a 2D array of data taken from an excel spreadsheet which I'm currently sorting based on a column with data on criticality.

#rows contains my data that I'm sorting, it's a 2D array
searchdict = dict(Critical=1, High=2, Medium=3, Low=4)
rows.sort(key=lambda row: searchdict.get(row[11], 5))

I'd like to sort based on another column if it's a tie for that column, anyone know how to approach this? Thanks in advance for any help.

FYI: the other column contains numerical data

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a tuple in your key. This is method is generally considered more "pythonic" than doing two sorts in a row.

key=lambda row: (searchdict.get(row[11], 5), row[other_column]))
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The OP said that the other column is numerical so there is no need for an other call to searchdict.get. (BTW: thg's answer was incorrect also because if you want to do 2 sorts you must first sort by the secondary key, and the by the primary key.) –  Bakuriu May 31 '13 at 20:27
1  
Oops, you're right. And thg's answer was also incorrect because sort() normally returns None instead of the sorted list (sorted() is normally used for that). –  JAB May 31 '13 at 20:33
    
thanks, that did the trick! –  avorum May 31 '13 at 20:50

python sort is stable, so you can sort in multiple passes (in reverse order):

data.sort(key=second criteria)
data.sort(key=first criteria)

This is the simplest option and can also be faster than generating a synthetic key on the fly.

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Really great insight, never realized this about the builtin sort method –  qwwqwwq Sep 9 '13 at 15:44

The best option would be to use key with python's tuple ordering.

#rows contains my data that I'm sorting, it's a 2D array
searchdict = dict(Critical=1, High=2, Medium=3, Low=4)
rows.sort(key=lambda row: (searchdict.get(row[11], 5), searchdict.get(row[<secondary column index here>], 5)))

This plays off of the fact that the leftmost element in a tuple is considered to be more significant during comparisons, demonstrated here:

>>> (6, 5) > (5, 6)
True
>>> (6, 5) > (6, 4)
True
>>> (6, 5) > (6, 6)
False
>>> (2, 1, 1) > (1, 1000, 1000)
True 
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Use a tuple as return from your sort key function:

rows.sort(key=lambda row: (searchdict.get(row[11], 5), row[17]))

Python sorts for item with index 0 first than for item with index 1.

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