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This question has in the back of my mind for some time, sorry if it appears subjective. There are some disadvantages in using bool in public properties and constructors for data objects. Consider the following code as an example.

Using bool:

public class Room
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool Bookable { get; set; }

    public Room(string name, bool bookable);
}

and the use of this class

Room r = new Room ("101", true);

This is suitably functional, there is however another way to implement it:

Using enum:

public enum BookingStatus
{
    Bookable,
    NotBookable
}

public class Room
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public BookingStatus Bookable { get; set; }

    public Room(string name, BookingStatus bookable);
}

and the use of this class

Room r = new Room ("101", BookingStatus.Bookable);

To me the two appear functionally equivalent, there are some advantages and disadvantages of each however:

  • When setting properties the Enum method is more verbose (you can infer the usage of the enum from the code alone)
  • Enumerations can be extended to support further states (particularly useful for an API)
  • Enumerations require considerably more typing (although reduces this vastly)
  • Enumerations can not be used in conditionals (i.e. if (r.bookable)), although I appreciate this is trivial to resolve.

Am I missing something, totally off the mark? I am not sure why this bugs me so much, perhaps I am too OCD for my own good!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In his book Refactoring, Martin Fowler explains why he thinks enums are a code smell, and I can only agree. In your example, a better approach would be to make an abstract Room class:

public abstract class Room
{
     public string Name { get; set; }

     public abstract bool Bookable { get; }
}

Then you can make derived BookableRoom and NonBookableRoom classes.

public class BookableRoom : Room
{
    public override bool Bookable
    {
        get { return true; }
    }
}

public class NonBookableRoom : Room
{
    public override bool Bookable
    {
        get { return false; }
    }
}
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Strong point, and a method I have used else where. I presume this wouldn't work very well with something like Entity Framework? However it would certainly map very well onto something like a SharePoint list. –  Richard Slater Nov 6 '09 at 10:18
7  
Why do you state that this is a better approach? To me it looks just as increasing of complexity. I think the KISS principle is appropriate here. –  nightcoder May 27 '11 at 17:21
    
The book provides a comprehensive description :) –  Mark Seemann May 27 '11 at 19:16
2  
I agree with @nightcoder, and am confused by the selection of this answer. Was the OP's concern that an enumeration would not be a complex and verbose enough way to flip a single bit? So we should bake every runtime state of every object type into our source code? Just what does Martin Fowler say to defend this practice? –  harpo May 27 '11 at 21:00
    
To be clear, what kind of Enums are Mr. Fowler talking about? As much as I like C#, it's enums aren't particularly powerful or consistent. I find Ada-esque enums to be very useful, but I'm open to arguments. –  weberc2 Dec 4 '12 at 21:59

Simply because of readability and understanding of the code, I'll go for enum instead of boolean.

Compare BookingStatus.Bookable and true, of course you would understand more reading BookingStatus.Bookable.

Also like what fforw mentioned, in case in future you might need to add more options, enum would be easier to change.

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What about type safety? An enum would prevent any old Boolean value from being dropped into an enum parameter. –  weberc2 Dec 4 '12 at 22:00

Ih there is any chance that in the future there might be more than the initial two options, adding a third option to an enum is a lot less work then changing all bool to enum.

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That's what he already said in his answer (second point in the bullet list). –  Stefan Steinegger Nov 6 '09 at 10:35
    
except for the "plan for the future" aspect. –  fforw Nov 6 '09 at 10:46

For a property I would probably agree. In 'Clean Code' though, it is indicated (correctly) that bools hide intent when used as parameters. For example, a formatting method might look like:

public void Format(bool pBold, bool pItalic, bool pUnderline)
{ ... }

When called this looks like:

Format(true, false, true);

Instead it would be much more readable as:

public enum BOLD { BOLD, NOT_BOLD }
public enum ITALIC { ITALIC, NOT_ITALIC }
public enum UNDERLINE { UNDERLINE, NOT_UNDERLINE }

public void Format(BOLD pBold, ITALIC pItalic, UNDERLINE pUnderline)
{ ... }

Which then makes the call look like:

Format(BOLD.BOLD, ITALIC.NOT_ITALIC, UNDERLINE.NOT_UNDERLINE);

(Remember this is just an example of how bool parameters hide intent; there are probably better ways to implement the above code.)

In your particular case, notice the difference between the two constructor calls:

// enum; intent is clear
Room r = new Room ("101", BookingStatus.Bookable);

// bool; true what?
Room r = new Room("101", true);
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1  
Also, you can't put a variable containing the would-be bold value into the 'italic' parameter slot when using enums. :) Type safety. –  weberc2 Dec 4 '12 at 22:02
    
// string; "101" what? Add a few more strings and you are in the same position as with a bool. So what do you do? You look at the method definition. –  Stijn Feb 19 '13 at 11:01
    
@Stijn Agreed. Not reading a method signature is not an excuse for not understanding a method signature. –  Dan Lugg Mar 1 '13 at 10:18
    
Nevertheless, one is more readable than the other. –  Sahuagin Mar 1 '13 at 15:02

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