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Given a table,

+-----+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
| user| min_lat | max_lat | min_lng | max_lng |
+-----+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
| a   |    46   |     407 |       6 |     367 | 
| b   |   226   |     227 |     186 |     188 |

And a Point(x, y) Find users where the point is within the min and max latitude and longitude ranges of users (where min and max long and lat = current position minus or plus radius).

Minimum values can be less than 0 and maximum values can be greater than 360, the query needs to take these into account.

E.g. filtering using Point(7,5) should also return user A, as 367-360=7.

Not sure if I'm getting this right, but hopefully somebody can give me some insight.

share|improve this question
    
Point(4,5) is a better example, as 7 is in the range 6..367 (without taking into account a==b mod 360). 4 is outside the range but within a's region. Also, every Point is in the region (6..367, 46..407); perhaps (50..367, 46..407) is a better test region, as the longitude range excludes some values but the latitude doesn't. Also, are the endpoints included in the regions? The terms "min" and "max" imply they are, but it's best to be explicit. –  outis Nov 11 '09 at 7:30

4 Answers 4

I recommend limiting the latitude & longitude values stored in the table to the range [0, 360]. Create triggers before insert and update to enforce the mod 360 equivalency and, if max-min > 360, set the min and max values to 0 and 360, respectively. For example:

delimiter ;;

CREATE TRIGGER normalize_inserted_ranges BEFORE INSERT 
  ON table
  FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
    IF NEW.max_lat - NEW.min_lat >= 360 THEN
        SET NEW.min_lat=0;
        SET NEW.max_lat=360;
    ELSE
        SET NEW.min_lat = NEW.min_lat % 360;
        SET NEW.max_lat = NEW.max_lat % 360;
    END IF;
    IF NEW.max_lng - NEW.min_lng >= 360 THEN
        SET NEW.min_lng=0;
        SET NEW.max_lng=360;
    ELSE
        SET NEW.min_lng = NEW.min_lng % 360;
        SET NEW.max_lng = NEW.max_lng % 360;
    END IF;
  END
;;
delimiter ;

You can then use the following query:

SELECT user FROM table
  WHERE
      IF(min_lng <= max_lng, 
         @x BETWEEN min_lng AND max_lng, 
         @x <= max_lng OR min_lng <= @x)
    AND
      IF(min_lat <= max_lat,
         @y BETWEEN min_lat AND max_lat, 
         @y <= max_lat OR min_lat <= @y)
;
share|improve this answer
    
I like your solution. My one misgiving about it is that you're losing information. It's difficult to tell from the original question what the ultimate intent is, but it seems like modding the values may erase valuable information. I suppose it's easy enough to retain the original data and store the modded data for faster searching at the expense of additional storage. Nice work! –  David Smith Nov 13 '09 at 7:46
    
The (lack of) requirements in the question about other uses of the data leave some latitude to change the storage representation. Point well taken about storing both forms as a time/space tradeoff. –  outis Nov 15 '09 at 4:27

To answer one part of your query, if you are saying that 367 and 7 are the same, I assume equally that 727 is also.

Therefore, you want to use the modulus of 360. E.g. the remainder of dividing by 360.

e.g. (where % is the C# and C++ syntax, you'll probably find an SQL way to do this)

7 % 360 = 7
367 % 360 = 7
727 % 360 = 7

Looks like something like SELECT b MOD 360 from table; is the sort of thing you want.

share|improve this answer

I suspect there is a more elegant answer, but I think the confines of a SQL where clause make this a little more difficult.

Assumptions:

  • 0 <= x < 360
  • 0 <= y < 360
  • max_lat - min_lat <= 361
  • max_lng - min_lng <= 361
SELECT user FROM user_location WHERE  
((min_lat <  0 AND ((0 <= y AND y <= max_lat) OR (min_lat + 360 <= y AND y < 360))) OR  
 (min_lat >= 0 AND ((min_lat <= y AND y <= max_lat) OR (0 <= y AND y <= max_lat - 360))))  
AND  
((min_lng <  0 AND ((0 <= x AND x <= max_lng) OR (min_lng + 360 <= x AND x <= 360))) OR  
 (min_lng >= 0 AND ((min_lng <= x AND x <= max_lng) OR (0 <= x AND x <= max_lng - 360))))

In one dimension, if min < 0 then x must fall between 0 and max or x must fall between min + 360 and 360. Similarly if min >= 0 then x must fall between min and max, or it must fall between 0 and max - 360.

The format above is presented for clarity. If you move the addition and subtraction of 360 to the x and y parameters, the comparisons become constant and probably speed the query dramatically.

share|improve this answer
    
Ended up using this, thanks! –  user167206 Nov 29 '09 at 21:48

Use a modulo to ensure all values are between 0 and 360, and the query becomes pretty simple. Assume {pointLat} and {pointLng} are the coordinates of the point that's being filtered on.

SELECT *
FROM table
WHERE IF(min_lat < max_lat,
        MOD({pointLat}, 360) BETWEEN MOD(min_lat, 360) AND MOD(max_lat, 360)),
        MOD({pointLat}, 360) NOT BETWEEN MOD(min_lat, 360) AND MOD(max_lat, 360)))
    AND IF(min_lng < max_lng,
        MOD({pointLng}, 360) BETWEEN MOD(min_lng, 360) AND MOD(max_lng, 360)),
        MOD({pointLng}, 360) NOT BETWEEN MOD(min_lng, 360) AND MOD(max_lng, 360)));

While this would work, I strongly recommend performing the MOD calculations outside the SQL query or adding extra columns with normalized values. Using the MOD function as in this code would prevent the query from taking advantage of any indexes on those columns.

share|improve this answer
    
If min = 350 and max = 370 and point = 2 then the comparison becomes "WHERE 2 BETWEEN 350 AND 10" which I believe will not match, but it should. –  David Smith Nov 8 '09 at 16:11
    
Query updated to properly deal with that case. –  jonthornton Nov 8 '09 at 20:58
    
Now you have: mod(2,360) between mod(350,360) and mod(370,360)... OR mod(2,360) between mod(370,360) and mod(350,360) which becomes 2 between 350 and 10 OR 2 between 10 and 350 Which still does not satisfy the criteria. –  David Smith Nov 10 '09 at 22:47
    
Third try's a charm? –  jonthornton Nov 12 '09 at 17:20

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