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In one source code I found this regex:

qr/(?!)/;

I simply can't figure out what this matches.

Honestly, absolutely don't understand what means the A zero-width negative look-ahead assertion. - what i found in the perlre. :(

Can someone explain it in an human language, please? :)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It is legal, but matches nothing at all.

The (?!...) construct is a negative lookahead assertion. In details, it means: "match a position where the regex that follows (...) should not match the input string".

But in this case, the "regex that follows" is the empty regex, which matches everything.

So, this regex essentially says "match a position where what follows cannot be matched by the empty regex"... And there can be no such position, whatever the input string. This is a regex construct which always fails!

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Don't want lie - so can't say: Ahh, fully understand now. But, your explanation gives me some light into the total darkness. Thank you. :) accept. –  novacik Jun 1 '13 at 0:31
    
I can give more details on demand ;) In particular, what an anchor in a regex means. If you want, I can give a full, more detailed explanation into the inner working of anchors ;) –  fge Jun 1 '13 at 0:33

The empty regex pattern matches a zero-length string, which is to say it always matches. It's an obvious progression:

'bbbbb' =~ /^(?:aaa|bbb)/   # Matches (Matches 3 "b"s, from pos 0 to 3)
'bbbbb' =~ /^(?:aaa|bb)/    # Matches (Matches 2 "b"s, from pos 0 to 2)
'bbbbb' =~ /^(?:aaa|b)/     # Matches (Matches 1 "b",  from pos 0 to 1)
'bbbbb' =~ /^(?:aaa|)/      # Matches (Matches 0 "b"s, from pos 0 to 0)

This means that (?=) ("Is this position followed by a zero-length string?") always matches and (?!) ("Is this position not followed by a zero-length string?") never matches. In fact, (?!) is optimised to (*FAIL) since the latter's introduction in 5.10.

(?!) aka (*FAIL) is useful to force backtracking when the pattern has side-effects.

'abcd' =~ /(.+?)(?{ print "$1\n" })(?!)/;

Output:

a
ab
abc
abcd
b
bc
bcd
c
cd
d

Explanation of example:

(?!) doesn't match, so the regex engine keeps trying to find a match by having .+? match more and more characters. When that fails, the regex engine tries to match at a later starting position.

This is called "backtracking". It's how the regex engine can match 'aaaab' =~ /a*ab/. The first time through, a* matches all 4 as, so the ab doesn't match, so the engine backtracks. The second time through, a* only matches 3 of the as, allowing ab and thus the whole pattern to match.

The step by step flow for the example I originally gave follows:

  1. Start matching at pos 0.
  2. (.+?) matches a at pos 0
  3. (?{ print "$1\n" }) prints a and matches zero chars
  4. (?!) doesn't match. ⇒ Backtrack!
  5. (.+?) matches ab at pos 0
  6. (?{ print "$1\n" }) prints ab and matches zero chars
  7. (?!) doesn't match. ⇒ Backtrack!
  8. (.+?) matches abc at pos 0
  9. (?{ print "$1\n" }) prints abc and matches zero chars
  10. (?!) doesn't match. ⇒ Backtrack!
  11. (.+?) matches abcd at pos 0
  12. (?{ print "$1\n" }) prints abcd and matches zero chars
  13. (?!) doesn't match. ⇒ Backtrack!
  14. (.+?) can't match anything else here. ⇒ Backtrack!
  15. Start matching at pos 1.
  16. (.+?) matches b at pos 1
  17. (?{ print "$1\n" }) prints b and matches zero chars
  18. (?!) doesn't match. ⇒ Backtrack!
  19. ...
  20. (.+?) matches d at pos 3
  21. (?{ print "$1\n" }) prints d and matches zero chars
  22. (?!) doesn't match. ⇒ Backtrack!
  23. (.+?) can't match anything else here. ⇒ Backtrack!
  24. Start matching at pos 4.
  25. (.+?) doesn't match. ⇒ Backtrack!
  26. Pattern doesn't match.
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I need learn much much more to be able understand the example. I understand the (.+?) = match the shortest possible string and add it to the capture-group, understand the push..., but haven't any idea why it is repeats - so why gives the above result. I'm a beginner only - but thank you. ;) –  novacik Jun 1 '13 at 0:43
    
(?!) doesn't match, so the regex engine keeps trying to find a match by having .+? match more characters. When that fails, the regex engine tries to match at a later starting position. This is called "backtracking". It's how the regex engine can match 'aaaab' =~ /a*ab/. The first time through, a* matches all 5 as, so the ab doesn't match, so it backtracks. The second time through, a* only matches 4 as, allowing ab to match. –  ikegami Jun 1 '13 at 0:47
    
... and I thought I knew regex –  kizzx2 Jun 1 '13 at 1:20
    
@kizzx2, Well, that's the theoretical view of things. Implementation generally have many optimisations. –  ikegami Jun 1 '13 at 1:24
1  
For historical interest, (*FAIL) wasn't always there; (?!) worked at least a decade earlier :) –  hobbs Jun 1 '13 at 3:43

(?=), an empty positive lookahead, will always match. It’s a hackish way to set the value of the last successful match. (?!) is its inverse, and will never match.

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