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I have the following classes:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class M
{
};

class N:public M
{
};

class A
{
    public:
        virtual void f(M& m)=0;
};

class B:public A
{
    public:
        void f(M& m){cout<<"using M version"<<endl;}
        void f(N& n){cout<<"using N version"<<endl;}
};

and the following implementation:

int main()
{
    N n;
    A &o = *new B();
    o.f(n);
    //o.f(static_cast<N&>(n));
}

Basically I want "void f(N&)" to be implemented instead of "void f(M&)" when calling "o.f(n)", but not sure how to achieve it.

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3  
Seems like virtual functions would work better for the behaviour you want. –  chris Jun 1 '13 at 1:07
    
Use virtual functions. –  Kerrek SB Jun 1 '13 at 1:07
2  
Oh, and don't forget to have a virtual destructor when using classes polymorphically so that the derived class is cleaned up properly. And while I'm at it, smart pointers work perfectly well for polymorphism as well. –  chris Jun 1 '13 at 1:08
    
Good reading from the C++ FAQ: 20 Inheritance - virtual functions –  DavidRR Jun 1 '13 at 1:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For the specific behavior that you describe, you can use a static_cast:

f(static_cast<B&>(*pa));

But everybody is right, you're better off using true polymorphism by making the show() method virtual:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
    private:
        int a;
    public:
        A():a(1){}
        virtual void show(){cout<<a<<endl;}
};

class B:public A
{                                                                                                                                                                                     
    private:
        int b;
    public:
        B():b(2){}
        void show(){cout<<b<<endl;}
};

void f(A & a) {a.show();}

int main()
{
    A * pa = new A();
    f(*pa);
    pa = new B();
    f(*pa);
}
share|improve this answer

You should use virtual functions. This is what polymorphism is for: To determine the type of object at runtime. Modify the code as follows by making f() as a virtual function.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
    private:
        int a;
    public:
        A():a(1){}
        void show(){cout<<a<<endl;}
        virtual void f(A & a) {a.show();}
};

class B:public A
{
    private:
        int b;
    public:
        B():b(2){}
        void show(){cout<<b<<endl;}
        virtual void f(B & a) {a.show();}
};

int main()
{
    A * pa = new A();
    f(*pa);
    pa = new B();
    f(*pa);
}
share|improve this answer

Keep a pointer to B and call f(*pb). Or f(*static_cast<B*>(pa));.

Although I think what you might really want is to make your method virtual.

virtual void show(){cout<<a<<endl;}

It will still call the first f() but will call the show() method of B.

The following example should help you undertand better the different concepts in actions:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    void show(){cout<<"show: A"<<endl;}
    virtual void show_virtual(){cout << "show_virtual: A" << endl; }
};

class B:public A
{
public:
    void show(){cout<<"show: B"<<endl;}
    virtual void show_virtual(){cout << "show_virtual: B" << endl; }
};

void f(A & a)
{
    cout << "f(A&)" << endl;
    a.show();
    a.show_virtual();
}
void f(B & b)
{
    cout << "f(B&)" << endl;
    b.show();
    b.show_virtual();
}

int main()
{
    A * pa = new A();
    B * pb = new B();
    A * pb_a = pb;

    f(*pa);
    cout << endl;
    f(*pb);
    cout << endl;
    f(*pb_a);
}

With the following output

f(A&)
show: A
show_virtual: A

f(B&)
show: B
show_virtual: B

f(A&)
show: A
show_virtual: B
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  • Basically I want "void f(N&)" to be implemented instead of "void f(M&)" when calling "o.f(n)", but not sure how to achieve it.

You can't call "void f(N&)" because there's no such method in class A.

Solution: Declare void f(N&) in class A:

class A
{
    public:
        virtual void f(M& m)=0;
        virtual void f(N& n)=0;
}
share|improve this answer

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