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Is it possible to store a parameter pack somehow for a later use?

template <typename... T>
class Action {
private:        
    std::function<void(T...)> f;
    T... args;  // <--- something like this
public:
    Action(std::function<void(T...)> f, T... args) : f(f), args(args) {}
    void act(){
        f(args);  // <--- such that this will be possible
    }
}

Then later on:

void main(){
    Action<int,int> add([](int x, int y){std::cout << (x+y);}, 3, 4);

    //...

    add.act();
}
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3  
Yes; store a tuple and use some sort of index pack to make the call. –  Kerrek SB Jun 1 '13 at 1:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

To accomplish what you want done here, you'll have to store your template arguments in a tuple:

std::tuple<Ts...> args;

Furthermore, you'll have to change up your constructor a bit. In particular, initializing args with an std::make_tuple and also allowing universal references in your parameter list:

template <typename F, typename... Args>
Action(F&& func, Args&&... args)
    : f(std::forward<F>(func)),
      args(std::forward<Args>(args)...)
{}

Moreover, you would have to set up a sequence generator much like this:

namespace helper
{
    template <int... Is>
    struct index {};

    template <int N, int... Is>
    struct gen_seq : gen_seq<N - 1, N - 1, Is...> {};

    template <int... Is>
    struct gen_seq<0, Is...> : index<Is...> {};
}

And you can implement your method in terms of one taking such a generator:

template <typename... Args, int... Is>
void func(std::tuple<Args...>& tup, helper::index<Is...>)
{
    f(std::get<Is>(tup)...);
}

template <typename... Args>
void func(std::tuple<Args...>& tup)
{
    func(tup, helper::gen_seq<sizeof...(Args)>{});
}

void act()
{
   func(args);
}

And that it! So now your class should look like this:

template <typename... Ts>
class Action
{
private:
    std::function<void (Ts...)> f;
    std::tuple<Ts...> args;
public:
    template <typename F, typename... Args>
    Action(F&& func, Args&&... args)
        : f(std::forward<F>(func)),
          args(std::forward<Args>(args)...)
    {}

    template <typename... Args, int... Is>
    void func(std::tuple<Args...>& tup, helper::index<Is...>)
    {
        f(std::get<Is>(tup)...);
    }

    template <typename... Args>
    void func(std::tuple<Args...>& tup)
    {
        func(tup, helper::gen_seq<sizeof...(Args)>{});
    }

    void act()
    {
        func(args);
    }
};

Here is your full program on Coliru.


Update: Here is a helper method by which specification of the template arguments aren't necessary:

template <typename F, typename... Args>
Action<Args...> make_action(F&& f, Args&&... args)
{
    return Action<Args...>(std::forward<F>(f), std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

int main()
{
    auto add = make_action([] (int a, int b) { std::cout << a + b; }, 2, 3);

    add.act();
}

And again, here is another demo.

share|improve this answer
    
how would you call f(args) using a tuple? Can you expand the tuple back into the parameter pack? –  Eric B Jun 1 '13 at 1:24
    
could you expand on that a little in your answer? –  Eric B Jun 1 '13 at 1:27
    
Well, I do want to store them for later; I'll edit my question for clarity. –  Eric B Jun 1 '13 at 1:32
    
@EricB Okay, now that I've seen your update I know what to do. I will revise my question in a minute. –  0x499602D2 Jun 1 '13 at 1:41
1  
Since Ts... is a class template parameter, not a function template parameter, Ts&&... does not define a pack of universal references as there is no type deduction occurring for the parameter pack. @jogojapan shows the correct way to ensure you can pass universal references to the constructor. –  masrtis Jul 29 '13 at 16:51

You can use std::bind(f,args...) for this. It will generate a movable and possibly copyable object that stores a copy of the function object and of each of the arguments for later use:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>
#include <functional>

template <typename... T>
class Action {
public:

  using bind_type = decltype(std::bind(std::declval<std::function<void(T...)>>(),std::declval<T>()...));

  template <typename... ConstrT>
  Action(std::function<void(T...)> f, ConstrT&&... args)
    : bind_(f,std::forward<ConstrT>(args)...)
  { }

  void act()
  { bind_(); }

private:
  bind_type bind_;
};

int main()
{
  Action<int,int> add([](int x, int y)
                      { std::cout << (x+y) << std::endl; },
                      3, 4);

  add.act();
  return 0;
}

Notice that std::bind is a function and you need to store, as data member, the result of calling it. The data type of that result is not easy to predict (the Standard does not even specify it precisely), so I use a combination of decltype and std::declval to compute that data type at compile time. See the definition of Action::bind_type above.

Also notice how I used universal references in the templated constructor. This ensures that you can pass arguments that do not match the class template parameters T... exactly (e.g. you can use rvalue references to some of the T and you will get them forwarded as-is to the bind call.)

Final note: If you want to store arguments as references (so that the function you pass can modify, rather than merely use, them), you need to use std::ref to wrap them in reference objects. Merely passing a T & will create a copy of the value, not a reference.

Operational code on Coliru

share|improve this answer

I think you have an XY problem. Why go to all the trouble to store the parameter pack when you could just use a lambda at the callsite? i.e.,

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

typedef std::function<void()> Action;

void callback(int n, const char* s) {
    std::cout << s << ": " << n << '\n';
}

int main() {
    Action a{[]{callback(13, "foo");}};
    a();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Because in my application, an Action actually has 3 different functors that are all related, and I'd rather classes that contain it contain 1 Action, and not 3 std::function –  Eric B Jun 3 '13 at 15:27

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