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I'm developing a server which involves a lot of broadcasting of identical data to multiple clients over TCP.

Something like:

for(i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    send(client[i], buffer, ...);
}

Is there any facility to enable me to combine this into a single user/kernel transaction? An analog to vectored I/O is what I'm after (except ofcourse multiple socket handles; not buffers)

Notes:

  • The protocol choice (TCP) is non-negotiable (not my decision)
  • LSPs and the like are not an option.
  • Potential solutions must be compatible with overlapped I/O
  • The reason this is a problem is due to performance requirements (soft real-time; very sensitive to latency and jitter).
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When you are using Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012 you can make use of the Registered I/O extensions to get rid of the syscall overhead and to reduce latency.

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Thanks, I'll have to look into that. – Emjayen Jun 2 '13 at 10:39

TCP does not have any broadcast capabilities. You must copy your outgoing data to each connected client individually. If you don't want to do that, then you need to switch to UDP or Multicast instead, both of which support single-send broadcasting.

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I'm developing a server which involves a lot of broadcasting of identical data to multiple clients over TCP. You send to one client at a time, over a distinct connection.

There is no such thing as broadcast over TCP. It is a unicast, point-to-point protocol.

Is there any facility to enable me to combine this into a single user/kernel transaction? An analog to vectored I/O is what I'm after (except ofcourse multiple socket handles; not buffers)

No, there is no 'analog to vectored I/O' that encompasses 'multiple socket handles'. And if there was it would only solve your problem as far as the NIC. The repeated packets on the network would still constitite a latency and bandwidth issue.

The protocol choice (TCP) is non-negotiable (not my decision)

So, as per our discussion, that rules out UDP broadcast and UDP multicast.

LSPs and the like are not an option.

Whatever that means. Labelled Switched Path? Layered Service Provider? Label Distribution Protocol?

Potential solutions must be compatible with overlapped I/O

As there aren't any potential solutions, the issue does not arise.

The reason this is a problem is due to performance requirements (soft real-time; very sensitive to latency and jitter).

Bad luck. You would be better off using UDP multicast as it would also economize on network bandwidth, but I see that's not an option.

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P.S., Oh and the mere fact you think the performance issue must be related to congestion and not the system call overhead (as should be painfully obvious by now) is quite amusing, as is your confusion about what LSP could be referring to in an exclusively Winsock context. Confirms what I originally suspected. – Emjayen Jun 2 '13 at 9:59
    
I made no assertions about 'what the performance issue must be related to'; I merely mentioned some factors you seem to have overlooked. Questions that specify the 'TCP protocol' will get answers about the TCP protocol. Mentioning LSP without disambiguating which of at least 3 possible meanings you intend makes your question ambiguous and in need of clarification. Stop blaming the shortcomings of your question on everybody else. Clarify it. If you disagree with my answer, you will have to produce an API that does what you're looking for. Otherwise, further comments are of no interest. – EJP Jun 2 '13 at 10:08
    
It hasn't been overlooked; it's been explicitly prohibited, yet you insist on promoting it based on your inability to revise your understanding of the problem of which you are now using as a basis for more stupidly obvious points such as multicast reducing congestion. So following your own logic, if I were to specify I'm interfacing with a harddrive then raise a question about various I/O methods: you're going to start talking about buses? You're completely ridiculous. – Emjayen Jun 2 '13 at 10:28
    
So therefore if UDP has been explicity prohibited, your question is indeed about the TCP protocol, as the wording already states, and it has been answered. Twice. Correctly. I fail to see what is either productive or clever about antagonizing people who are trying to help you. – EJP Jun 2 '13 at 10:42

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