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I try to use

gpsSignal = currentLocation.horizontalAccuracy;

(gpsSignal is float)

I know, if gpsSignal is < 0 Signal is lost but, what does it mean when gpsSignal is 0.00 ???

greetings from cloudy germany

Edit: The result of horizontalAccuracy only is 0.00 if i use it on my iPad 4 ( only wifi) On my iPhone and iPad2 ( with celluar) it works as it should

So I think, the result of exactly 0.000 as return value of horizontalAccuracy means: there is no GPS

But I cant find this fact in documentation???

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ate you sure currentLication is initialized? did you get a valud lat lon when horAcc is 0? – AlexWien Jun 1 '13 at 11:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems you have found a bug. There are some "secrets" in Gps application developpment:

1) if latitude and longitude both have the value 0 and if this location is marked as valid then this is always a programming error, on your or on API side, or some other place. Although (0,0) is theoretically possible practically it is reachable only via simulation. No ship or airplane can exactly navigate to (0,0) with a precision of 10cm.

2) same applies to some other values, like hdop or in your case horAcc.

So ignore this location!

share|improve this answer
    
The result of horizontalAccuracy only is 0.00 if i use it on my iPad 4 ( only wifi) On my iPhone and iPad2 ( with celluar) it works as it should So I think, the result of exactly 0.000 as return value of horizontalAccuracy means: there is no GPS But I cant find this fact in documentation??? – Hape42 Jun 2 '13 at 9:43
    
I think it means there is no horicontal Accuracy available. There is always a lack in many formatds and protocoll to distinguish between measure "explicitly invalid", and "measure not available". The NMEA Gps Protocoll has the same problem, it is not specified how to deal with not available attributes. – AlexWien Jun 2 '13 at 13:14

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