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I am learning C threading concepts and I wrote simple below code. Now when I compile and run it , I get random behaviour like it prints unexpectedly.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void * func_threadName(void * i) {

    int *x=(int *)i;
    printf("I'm thread : %d\n",*x);

return NULL;
}
main()
{
    int iter;
    printf("testing multithreading....\n");

    pthread_t thread_arr[3];

    for (iter=0;iter<3;iter++)
    {
        pthread_create(&thread_arr[iter],NULL,func_threadName,&iter);

    }

     for (iter=0;iter<3;iter++)
     {
         pthread_join(thread_arr[iter],NULL);
     }
}

It prints unpredictably like :

diwakar@diwakar-VPCEH25EN:~/Documents/my_C_codes$ ./thread_test.o 
testing multithreading....
I'm thread : 0
I'm thread : 0
I'm thread : 0
diwakar@diwakar-VPCEH25EN:~/Documents/my_C_codes$ ./thread_test.o 
testing multithreading....
I'm thread : 0
I'm thread : 2
I'm thread : 1
diwakar@diwakar-VPCEH25EN:~/Documents/my_C_codes$ ./thread_test.o 
testing multithreading....
I'm thread : 2
I'm thread : 2
I'm thread : 0

But when I make a slight change like below after creating thread, it works perfectly and prints in order.

pthread_create(&thread_arr[iter],NULL,func_threadName,&iter);
        sleep(1);

Now the output is this everytime:

diwakar@diwakar-VPCEH25EN:~/Documents/my_C_codes$ ./thread_test.o 
testing multithreading....
I'm thread : 0
I'm thread : 1
I'm thread : 2
diwakar@diwakar-VPCEH25EN:~/Documents/my_C_codes$ ./thread_test.o 
testing multithreading....
I'm thread : 0
I'm thread : 1
I'm thread : 2
diwakar@diwakar-VPCEH25EN:~/Documents/my_C_codes$ ./thread_test.o 
testing multithreading....
I'm thread : 0
I'm thread : 1
I'm thread : 2

I would like to understand that in the first case , is the unpredictable behaviour shown because all threads share the same memory space and hence before one thread terminates, other is using the same value of i ? Any additional info is welcome.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't tell exactly when the threads are going to run, so the main thread may continue and thereby change the counter in its loop. And as that loop counter is a pointer all threads have the same pointer pointing to the exactly the same variable. You also use the same variable in the second loop, so it can be modified twice during the lifetime of the threads.

It would be better (though more "hackish") to pass the number "as is":

pthread_create(&thread_arr[iter], NULL, func_threadName, (void *) iter);

Then in the thread function get it like so:

int x = (int) i;
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1  
-1 no, it isn't better, it is much worse. Why hacking when one can simple declare an array to hold the values? Bad. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 1 '13 at 20:28

Every thread should see a different int object, so you'd have to manage that with a second array.

void * func_threadName(void * i) {

    int *x= i;
    printf("I'm thread : %d\n",*x);

    return NULL;
}

int main(void) {
  printf("testing multithreading....\n");

  pthread_t thread_arr[3];
  int iter_id[3];

  for (int iter=0; iter<3; iter++) {
    iter_id[iter] = iter;
    pthread_create(&thread_arr[iter], NULL, func_threadName, &iter_id[iter]);
  }

  for (iter=0;iter<3;iter++) {
    pthread_join(thread_arr[iter],NULL);
  }
}

Also in C

  • you don't have to cast a void* when assigning it to another data pointer
  • all functions, even main must be declared with a return type
  • a function that doesn't receive a parameter should be declared and defined with (void)
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The problem with the code is that you pass the address of the variable instead of the value. Hence, all the threads refer to the "same" value stored by that address. This means, as Joachim mentioned, that the value may not change fast enough so that newly created threads get it. When using 'sleep' the main thread allows the processor to execute other instructions and therefore change the value of the iteration variable before creating a new thread. To conclude, you need to pass the value of the variable instead of the address as in the Joachim's example.

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