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I want to know which one is better in performance terms: a "regular" python function with state, or a generator. Unlike similar questions, I'm using the most simplified function to isolate the problem:

Regular function:

 >>> def counter_reg():
         if not hasattr(count_regular,"c"):
             count_regular.c = -1
         count_regular.c +=1
         return count_regular.c

Generator functions:

>>> def counter_gen():
    c = 0
    while True:
        yield c
        c += 1

>>> counter = counter_gen()
>>> counter = counter.next

In both cases, calling counter() and counter_reg() will produce the same output.

Which one is better in terms of performance? Thanks,

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1  
Just by looking at the first function, I would not recommend doing that. At least define a class with __iter__, or if you need it as a function have a default argument def counter_reg(c=[-1]) and mutate that –  jamylak Jun 1 '13 at 9:06
    
counter_gen() produces a new counter every time you call it, counter_reg() increments a global (albeit namespaced to the function). Big difference. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 1 '13 at 9:25
3  
And you can time these things yourself with the timeit module. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 1 '13 at 9:26
1  
Better optimize for readability. I doubt generator performance is the bottleneck. (If it is, you probably should not be using Python.) –  Nikita Nemkin Jun 1 '13 at 9:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is an example of how you can benchmark Python functions using the timeit module:

test.py:

import itertools as IT

def count_regular():
     if not hasattr(count_regular,"c"):
         count_regular.c = -1
     count_regular.c +=1
     return count_regular.c

def counter_gen():
    c = 0
    while True:
        yield c
        c += 1

def using_count_regular(N):
    return [count_regular() for i in range(N)]

def using_counter_gen(N):
    counter = counter_gen()
    return [next(counter) for i in range(N)]    

def using_itertools(N):
    count = IT.count()
    return [next(count) for i in range(N)]    

Run python like this to time the functions:

% python -mtimeit -s'import test as t' 't.using_count_regular(1000)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 336 usec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s'import test as t' 't.using_counter_gen(1000)'
10000 loops, best of 3: 172 usec per loop
% python -mtimeit -s'import test as t' 't.using_itertools(1000)'
10000 loops, best of 3: 105 usec per loop

For a more thorough benchmarking, try different values of N, though in this case I don't think it is going to matter.

So as you would expect, using itertools.count is faster than either count_regular or counter_gen.

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