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I am trying to make a class that will read a text file of names into an array, then return that array to the main class. However I am having an error when attempting to define the arrays.

public class Test{
String[] foo;
String[] zoo;
String[] yoo;
}

I get an error on String[] yoo

Syntax error on token ";", { expected after this 
token

I really have no clue what is going on, can anyone help?

Edit - Actual section of code

    String[] swords;
    String[] prefix;
    String[] suffix;
    String[] rarity;
    String[] colors = {"2","3","4","5","6","7","9","a","b","c","d","e","f"};
    String[] bows = new String[3];
    String[] enchantments = {"Frost","Igniton","Projection","Explosion","Enhance Jump","Enhance Speed","Resist Flames","Invisibility"};
    rarity = new String[1000];
    swords = new String[1000];
    bows = new String[1000];
    prefix = new String[1000];
    suffix = new String[1000];
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3  
There is no error in your class code. Can you share the complete code –  Juned Ahsan Jun 1 '13 at 14:59
1  
there is no error...was compiled successfully in mine –  pinkpanther Jun 1 '13 at 15:00
    
Ok, i'll add actual code –  user1735876 Jun 1 '13 at 15:00
    
what is issuing this error? your compiler? your ide? in which case, can you say which version. –  Mike Hogan Jun 1 '13 at 15:01
    
post full code for good responses –  pinkpanther Jun 1 '13 at 15:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should not initialize like this in outside the constructors or methods

Wrong:

public Test{
 String[] rarity;
 String[] swords;
 rarity = new String[1000]; 
 swords = new String[1000];
}

You can do this

public Test{
      String[] rarity = new String[1000]; 
      String[] swords = new String[1000];
    }

if the variables are static you can use static block

public Test{
   private static int x;
   static{
          x=2;
   }

}

Use constructor instead to initialize:

 public Test{
    String[] swords;
    String[] prefix;
    String[] suffix;
    String[] rarity;
    String[] colors = {"2","3","4","5","6","7","9","a","b","c","d","e","f"};
    String[] bows = new String[3];
    String[] enchantments = {"Frost","Igniton","Projection","Explosion","Enhance Jump","Enhance Speed","Resist Flames","Invisibility"};
  public Test(){
    rarity = new String[1000];
    swords = new String[1000];
    bows = new String[1000];
    prefix = new String[1000];
    suffix = new String[1000];
  }
}

That's all

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Thank you! I'm new to java and am just trying to get a footing in things. –  user1735876 Jun 1 '13 at 15:19

You can't assign values to fields outside of the field declaration or a block (or constructor). So this line

rarity = new String[1000];

(and the other similar ones) should be in the constructor, or the declaration should also initialize the field:

String[] rarity = new String[1000];
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unless you post all of your code it is not possible to be sure the answer is correct.

but I guess you have this:

rarity = new String[1000];
swords = new String[1000];
bows = new String[1000];
prefix = new String[1000];
suffix = new String[1000];

outside a method. that is not possible in Java.

do like this instead:

String[] rarity = new String[1000];

or init the field inside a method/constructor

share|improve this answer
    
After doing that there is still an error on line 7, can you not define the contents of an array outside a method? –  user1735876 Jun 1 '13 at 15:11
    
please post at least the first 20 lines of your class, I think you have something on line 7 that is not in line with how Java works. –  Vegard Jun 1 '13 at 15:15

First of all, you should make them public or private(unless you really need it to be package-private).

An array is created like this: Type[] variableName = new Type[length];

length is the size of the array, for example String[] test = new String[5] can contain 5 strings. To set them use test[i] = someString; where i is the index(starting at 0 and ending at length - 1).

You can also make an ArrayList if you do not want your array to be limited, but that uses a bit more memory.

ArrayList<Type> variableName = new ArrayList<>();

For example: ArrayList<String> test = new ArrayList<>();

To add to it use test.add(someString) and to get: arrayList.get(i) where i is the index.

A disadvantage of ArrayList is that primitive types(int, byte, boolean, ...) cannot be used. You'll need to use Integer, Byte, Boolean, ...

If you have an ArrayList<Integer>, you could intArrayList.add(5) because autoboxing transforms 5 into new Integer(5).

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1  
Making them public would be much worse than leaving them package private. –  JB Nizet Jun 1 '13 at 15:10

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