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This is the code I have so far, it compiles and runs fine but I need help adapting it. It is a banking app that currently works for just one account.

It needs to be adapted to with two new files: bank.h and bank.cpp and, main should contain a pointer to bank and bank should contain an array of pointers to instances of account.

so the new interface would work someting like:

account> 1 12

1 is the account# and 12 is the ammount being depositted.

I really need help adapting me code to do this, I am lost on how to create the array of pointers in bank to instances of account. Any help is much appreciated.

 //main.cpp file
using namespace std;

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "account.h"

//allocate new space for class pointer
account* c = new account;

//function for handling I/O
int accounting(){

string command;

cout << "account> ";
cin >> command;

    //exits prompt  
    if (command == "quit"){
        exit(0);
        }

    //overwrites account balance
    else if (command == "init"){
        cin >> c->value;
        c->init();
        accounting();
        }

    //prints balance
    else if (command == "balance"){
        cout << "" << c->account_balance() << endl;
        accounting();
        }

    //deposits value
    else if (command == "deposit"){
        cin >> c->value;
        c->deposit();           
        accounting();
        }

    //withdraws value
    else if (command == "withdraw"){
        cin >> c->value;    
        c->withdraw();
        accounting();
        }

    //error handling    
    else{
        cout << "Error! Invalid operator." << endl;
        accounting();
        }
//frees memory          
delete c;           
}


int main() {

accounting();

return 0;
}

//account.h header file containing class with shared variables and functions

class account{

   private:

    int balance;

    public:

        account();
        ~account();
        int value;
        int account_balance();
        int deposit();
        int withdraw();
        int init();

};

//account.cpp implementation file

using namespace std;

#include <iostream>
#include "account.h"

account::account(){ 
}

account::~account(){
}

//balance overwrite function
int account::init(){

    balance = value;    
}

//balance function
int account::account_balance() {

    return balance;
}

//deposit function
int account::deposit(){

    balance += value;
}

//withdraw function
int account::withdraw(){

    //error handling
    if(value>balance){
        cout << "Error! insufficient funds." << endl;
        return 0;
        }

    balance -= value;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

First of all,

//error handling    
else{
    cout << "Error! Invalid operator." << endl;
    accounting();
    }

This look ugly, you are recursively calling accounting function after every bad input. Imagine a situation where user type 1 000 000x bad inputs... you will then try to free the memory 1 000 000x times - after one successful input!

//frees memory          
delete c;   

The whole accounting function is designed wrong. I suppose you don't want to destroy the account after some kind of transaction, right? I think the person who withdraws 10 dollars from their 10 million dollars account which will be then destroyed, will change bank immediately :)

So a while cycle with continue could be solution

//function for handling I/O
int accounting(){

string command;

while(true) {
cout << "account> ";
cin >> command;

    //exits prompt  
    if (command == "quit"){
        break;
        }

    //overwrites account balance
    else if (command == "init"){
        cin >> c->value;
        c->init();
        continue;
        }

    //prints balance
    else if (command == "balance"){
        cout << "" << c->account_balance() << endl;
        continue;
        }

    //deposits value
    else if (command == "deposit"){
        cin >> c->value;
        c->deposit();           
        accounting();
        }

    //withdraws value
    else if (command == "withdraw"){
        cin >> c->value;    
        c->withdraw();
        continue;
        }

    //error handling    
    else{
        cout << "Error! Invalid operator." << endl;
        continue;
        }          
}

Then,

int value;

is not a class member, it should be argument of methods withdraw and deposit, like this

//deposit function
void account::deposit(int value){ //int changed to void, you are not returning anything!

    balance += value;
}

//withdraw function
bool account::withdraw(int value){
//error handling
if(value>balance){
    cout << "Error! insufficient funds." << endl;
    return false;
    }
if(value<0) {
    cout << "Haha, nice try!" << endl;
    return false;
}
balance -= value;
return true;

}

share|improve this answer

For an array you can use the std::vector class.

std::vector<account *>MyAccounts;
MyAccounts.push_back(new account());

Then you can use it like an array accessing it normally.

MyAccounts[i]->accountFunction();

update

I don't know enough about your code, so I give just some general examples here.

In your bank class you have a member like shown above )MyAccounts. Now when ever you add a new account to your bank, you can do it with the push back function.

For example to add a new account and set the initial amount of 100 moneyitems.

 MyAccounts.push_back(new account());
 size_t i = MyAccounts.size();
 MyAccounts[i]->setAmount(100);
share|improve this answer
    
Can you help me implement this in bank.h and bank.cpp –  Ianschramm Jun 1 '13 at 15:39
    
I showed you some sample code here. If you have more than one account, you need some way to identfiy it. Either give it a name or an id, like a bank account number. So when you want to deposit some money, you have to specify the id to use the proper account. –  Devolus Jun 1 '13 at 15:46
    
Im sorry I should of been more clear. It should have an array of 20 indices and each one is an account. So account[0] is the first account. –  Ianschramm Jun 1 '13 at 15:50
    
IN this case you can do std::vector<account *>MyAccounts(20) to reserve enough space for 20 accounts. Or if you always want to have these 20 acocunts, you can get rid of the pointers std::vector<account>MyAccounts(20) which would make the code easier. –  Devolus Jun 1 '13 at 15:51
    
There will always be 20 accounts so I would like to just make an array of 20 and assign a value to each index. So how would I use std::vector in bank.cpp and the class? I'm sorry I'm asking so many questions but I'm new to c++. –  Ianschramm Jun 1 '13 at 16:01

You can do something like below

   class Bank
{
public:
int AddAccount(Account act){ m_vecAccts.push_back(act);}
....
private:
...
std:vector<account> m_vecAccts;
}

Update: This is just a Bank class with vector of accounts as private member variable. AddAccount is public function which can add account to vector

share|improve this answer
    
That seems to be over my head, can you explain more? –  Ianschramm Jun 1 '13 at 15:23
    
@lanschramm can u explain what is going over ur head. –  Alien01 Jun 2 '13 at 7:30

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