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I have a couple questions regarding best practices and performance for this project I am working on. Forgive me for the huge question.

I'm currently building a text-based game with PHP and MySql that is about 2,500 lines in the core file so far. Currently, this is a library of completely modular functions. Some used for data access, some for data manipulation, and so on.

My first question is this: One class, ItemManager, contains dozens of methods specifically for adding, updating, and deleting game items in the database. The only thing these methods have in common in they interact with the database. Currently, the constructor asks for a mysqli object and then uses that in all it's functions. However, once I add MongoDB into the project, some of these functions may be interacting with a different database.

Would it be acceptable or preferable to simply make all of these functions static? I see no reason to instantiate objects when there would only ever be one, and there is no need for it to maintain class members. So, should I use static methods or not? Why?

Second question: Can someone help me understand the benefit of using classes in PHP BESIDES modularity (as I can achieve that same effect with files of functions)? Coming from a Java background, I recognize the benefit of OOP in a persistent environment, as objects maintain data and states throughout the life of the application. However, with PHP, the life span of a script is a fraction of a second and all state information is stored within a database. Almost all functions just manipulate the database, so what's the purpose? Isn't it pointless to instantiate objects when I can merely call functions? Could I just do entirely static classes containing categorized data manipulation classes without instantiating an object of a class? What are the reasons I should use classes over files of functions? Isn't the basically the same? Are completely static functions acceptable?

Thank you for your time, I wasn't sure how to cut that question into less text, so I apologize.

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I believe this belongs to programmers.stackexchange.com/faq –  Maerlyn Jun 1 '13 at 18:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Would it be acceptable or preferable to simply make all of these functions static? I see no reason to instantiate objects when there would only ever be one

There is no reason to instantiate objects if all you ever want to do is what this class is capable of doing. By using static methods you are coupling all of your client code with the class by hardcoding the class name throughout your code base. If at some later point you decide that you might want a different item manager service to fulfill your requests you will most certainly have a bad day.

Note that "a different item manager" can be simply code for "a mock manager used to unit test the rest of your code". So even in cases where alternatives will never be supported, using statics like that makes your code practically untestable.

Of course, you have already mentioned that there could very well be a different item manager in place: if the current one accepts a mysqli object then obviously there is no abstraction layer between your manager code and the mysqli interface. If you want to use a different object to connect to Mongo, how is the current item manager code going to support both configurations? Won't you need to write a new item manager class? How are you going to integrate it with the rest of the code if the class name is hardcoded everywhere?

Let's also view the situation from the opposite side: what does static gain you?

Obviously it makes the item manager a "singleton" object, which may sound like a good idea because "there is only one of it". This idea cannot be dismissed out of hand in PHP (as in other languages where multithreading is supported and there are hidden cross-thread dependencies), but it still doesn't hold much water. If you want your item manager to be a singleton, then simply don't create a second instance. If you want to force this for some reason, use a static variable to count instantiations and throw if you try more than one. Finally, make the class final so that this limitation cannot be removed. The result: a singleton that is not static.

This is all that static has going for it, and in light of the above it's awfully weak to stand as an argument.

and there is no need for it to maintain class members. So, should I use static methods or not? Why?

I 'm not sure what this means -- you say the constructor already requires a database driver object, which has every right to be a class member. This is another obvious hint that static is not the way to go here.

Can someone help me understand the benefit of using classes in PHP BESIDES modularity (as I can achieve that same effect with files of functions)?

I 'm not going to present obvious arguments for OOP here, but raise a counter-point instead: you can achieve the same runtime effect, but you most certainly cannot achieve the same levels of maintainability and debugability for your application. Why use an inferior solution?

Coming from a Java background, I recognize the benefit of OOP in a persistent environment, as objects maintain data and states throughout the life of the application. However, with PHP, the life span of a script is a fraction of a second and all state information is stored within a database. Almost all functions just manipulate the database, so what's the purpose? Isn't it pointless to instantiate objects when I can merely call functions?

The life span of a process is a fraction of a second. The life span of the code base is measured in months, years and decades. That's how long people will be maintaining it, and that's why we use OOP in the first place.

Global variables can hold state just as well as class members, and people have been maintaining state long before "object-oriented" was a term. The benefit of OO is managing the complexity of the source-code-level model of the code, a venture I would most certainly not agree to describe as pointless.

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I see what you mean as far as replacing ItemManager in the future. I was looking at it like this: I decide to change the newItem method to use Mongo instead of MySql, so I would just change the method definition and it's use in the pages would remain the same, but you make a good point. It's tough for me to picture this in the same fashion as I would games I've worked on in Java. Thank you for your input. –  Tyler Jun 2 '13 at 2:36

So, should I use static methods or not? Why?

Static methods usually access static variables, which are global state (they are no different than global variables in this regard), which are bad, for many reasons.

Also, while an object instance can be replaced by an other object having the same interface, just by passing an other object to functions using it, static methods cannot easily be replaced. As a result, you can not mock them, and code using them is not easily unit-testable.

If you can, don't use static methods.

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I understand what you're saying. My original thought was why bother instantiating an object of a class when each method is only used to alter database values. It's hard to me to view PHP in the same fashion as the languages I use for other purposes. Thank you for your advice. –  Tyler Jun 2 '13 at 2:26

1) Stick with the object, as it is easily replaceable or extendable by additional db drivers (e.g. you can overwrite some functions to transparently redirect to MongoDB for special getters.) If you are sure that you will use only once instance, use a singleton, or even better, a regitry pattern.

2) PHPs lifespan isn´t that short. Using an MVC pattern it handles bootstrap, routing, models, business logic and output. So while a single request might only take seconds, it can involve hundreds of classes and thousands of methods.

To stick to your RPG example: One day you might decide to make it multiplayer. Now you can either instanciate a second player-object, or adapt about 500 functions. The former one is only possible with classes.

A great reason is human limitation: It is unlikely to keep the meaning of thousands of functions in mind, especially when working in teams. By using objects, you can define slim APIs. If the player-object has the public methods add_item(\item $item) and remove_item(\item $item), there won´t be a need to keep all those checking, calculating and db-handling functions in mind. You can even ask a fellow developer "create a \monster item with nothing but an attack() method". That´s it, you are done, and cooperation worked at it´s best.

Conclusion If you are from Java background and understand OOP, don´t think twice about ditching that habit. PHP is NOT a pre-OO-script to be used by scriptkiddies. It´s a full-fledged OO environment - but it´s up to you if you take advantage of this.

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You make valid points. Currently, it is a multiplayer set up, but there is never a need to process more than two players in a single script (in cases like PVP combat), however, the benefit becomes more apparent when thinking about a tournament or something where many players would need considered. Thank you for your input. –  Tyler Jun 2 '13 at 2:23

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