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Post an example to execute a "C" statement without semicolon( ; )

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What is this? Homework? –  S.Lott Nov 6 '09 at 13:36
    
That's no a good question.. please be more specific! void main(void) {} -- A statement without ';' –  Shirkrin Nov 6 '09 at 13:37
1  
Why close this? Why "not a real question"? It does seem like one to me. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 6 '09 at 13:44
4  
It's a question: "Is it?". It's programming related (related to the C language). I may be a candidate for CW, but it is a legitimate question. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 6 '09 at 13:50
5  
I see a dangerous (I hope occasional) tendency in this community to close as not a real question when the question is too useless from a "real code" point of view, or too "newbie". Please let's try not to create a stronghold. I've seen this happen already too many times. If this is homework, so be it, we are not there to look into people's decision not to do their homeworks, except when blatant. This is a legitimate question, and deserves a legitimate answer, not -1 and not 4 closes. Thanks. –  Stefano Borini Nov 6 '09 at 13:55
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9 Answers

This line is a statement:

while (0) { }
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4  
how 'bout while (1) { }? At least you get some work done :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 6 '09 at 13:42
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@Martinho: too tiring. –  Steve Jessop Nov 6 '09 at 13:47
    
And there's another interesting fact about the 1 vs 0. The one with the 0 can be optimized away to nothing, while the one with the 1 cannot. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 6 '09 at 14:14
1  
for (;;) {} .. crap, coded myself right out of a clever comment. –  Tim Post Nov 6 '09 at 14:27
    
There was a very long and tedious discussion on news group comp.std.c about whether the compiler should be able to optimize away useless loops like the 'while (1) { }' loop. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 6 '09 at 20:24
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You can an expression in an if() as long as it evaluates to a scalar (integer, floating point number or pointer).

if (expr, 0) {}

According to the C grammar, expr is an expression. if(expr){} is a selection_statement, so this would match the bill.

Note that the ,0 isn't always necessary since the body of the if() is empty. So these would be equivalent statements, if expr returns a scalar:

if (expr) {}
while (expr, 0) {}
while (expr && 0) {}
while (expr || 0) {}

All would evaluate the expression once.

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1  
That won't make it a statement, but an expression. The whole thing (the if and the braces), is a statement, though. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 6 '09 at 13:43
    
Isn't a function call a statement, too? –  Aaron Digulla Nov 6 '09 at 13:52
    
when used inside an expression, it is an expression. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 6 '09 at 14:02
    
No, a function call is an expression which evaluates to its return value. –  György Andrasek Nov 6 '09 at 14:03
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+1 This answer provides a statement and a placeholder for doing things. –  mouviciel Nov 6 '09 at 14:06
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Wrong answer

... with a new right answer below.

int main(void)
{
}

The pair of braces in the definition of main is a compound-statement which is one of the valid forms for a statement.

Edit: although a statement can be a compound-statement, and a function-body consists of a compound-statement, when the compound-statement is a function-body, it's not a statement.

Edit, Edit:

This program does contain a statement which is executed, though:

int main(void)
{
    if (1) {}
}
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1  
Hmm, don't see a statement there - just a declaration and an empty function body. –  caf Nov 6 '09 at 13:37
3  
A function body consists of a compound statement. –  Charles Bailey Nov 6 '09 at 13:38
    
The body if main is a (compound) statement according to the C grammar. –  Aaron Digulla Nov 6 '09 at 13:39
    
Only the body is a statement. The whole of the code posted is a function definition. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 6 '09 at 13:40
    
Oh, I get you. Although a compound statement can be a function-body or a statement, when it's a function-body it's not technically a statement. –  Charles Bailey Nov 6 '09 at 13:43
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Use this function:

__asm {
     mov al, 2
     mov dx, 0xD007
     out dx, al
}
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6  
Not a C statement, but a proprietary compiler directive. –  gnud Nov 6 '09 at 13:52
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{ }

At least 15 characters are required to post an answer...

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if (i=2) {} // give `i` a value
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Even whole program (my GNU C built it despite result code returned is undefined). The question is WHY?

/* NEVER DO THIS!!! */
int main()
{
    {}
}

And in C++ we even can stabilize return code by this simple stack trick with variable (yes, it is dirty, I understand but I think it should work for most cases):

/* NEVER RELY ON SUCH TRICKS */
int main()
{
   if (int i=0) {}
}
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the why is backward compatibility, I guess. It will just issue a warning. –  Stefano Borini Nov 6 '09 at 14:00
    
Oops... should be 'why we should code something like this'... –  Roman Nikitchenko Nov 6 '09 at 14:03
    
+1 for the stack trick. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 6 '09 at 14:04
3  
Not quite. In C++, if main() doesn't have a return statement, it's guaranteed to return 0. –  György Andrasek Nov 6 '09 at 14:06
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int main()
{
  // This executes a statement without a semicolon
  if( int i = 10 )
  {      
    // Call a function
    if( Fibonacci(i) ) {}
  }

  // I have made my point
  return 0;
}

int Fibonacci(int n)
{
  return (n == 2) ? 1 : Fibonacci(n - 2) + Fibonacci(n - 1);
}
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#define _ ;

int main()
{
   return 0 _
}
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