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I've been working on some code for an assignment and I'm having an issue with nested templated types.

I need the following code to create a 3 element array of 3 element arrays (sort of like int b[3][3]):

Array< Array<int> > b(3);

Here are the relevant parts of my Array.h:

template <class T>
class Array{
    public:
    Array() : size(0){ data = NULL; }

    Array(int s) : size(s) { data = new T[size]; }

    Array(const Array & a) : size(a.length()) { 
       data = new T[a.length()];
       for(int i = 0; i < a.length(); ++i)
       data[i] = a[i];
    }

~Array(){ delete[] data; }  

T & operator[](int i) {
    if (i >= 0 && i < size){
        return data[i];
    } else {
        throw ArrayOutOfBounds(i);
    }
}

T operator[](int i) const{
    if (i >= 0 && i < size){
        return data[i];
    } else {
        throw ArrayOutOfBounds(i);
    }
}

Array<T> & operator=(const Array<T> &a){
    if(this == &a) return *this;
    delete[] data;
    data = new T[a.length()];
    for(int i = 0; i < a.length(); ++i)
        data[i] = a[i];
    size = a.length();
}

    int length() const { return size; }

    // Members

    private:
    int size;
    T * data;
}

Update 6/1 the full driver code:

   // Test driver for generic Array object with assignment and bounds checking

   #include "Array.h"

int main() {
    Array<int> a1(10);
for (int i = 0; i < a1.length(); ++i)
        a1[i] = i * i;
Array<int> a2 = a1;
try {
    for (int i = 0; i <= a2.length(); ++i)
        cout << a2[i] << " ";
    cout << endl;
}
catch (const ArrayOutOfBounds & e) {
    cout << endl << "ArrayOutOfBounds index=" << e.index << endl;
}
Array< Array<int> > b(3);
for (int i = 0; i < b.length(); ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < b[i].length(); ++j)
        b[i][j] = i*b[i].length() + j;
}
for (int i = 0; i < b.length(); ++i) {
    cout << "b[" << i << "]= ";
    for (int j = 0; j < b[i].length(); ++j)
        cout << b[i][j] << " ";
    cout << endl;
}

Array<const char *> c(3);
c[0] = "moe"; c[1] = "curly"; c[2] = "larry";
Array<const char *> d(10);
d = c;
for (int i = 0; i < d.length(); ++i)
    cout << "d[" << i << "]=" << d[i] << " ";
cout << endl;

return 0;
}     

Expected output:

0 1 4 9 16 25 36 49 64 81 
ArrayOutOfBounds index=10
b[0]= 0 1 2
b[1]= 3 4 5
b[2]= 6 7 8
d[0]=moe d[1]=curly d[2]=larry 

Update 6/2

Per Guillaume's solution, here is the resize method I used:

Array<T> & resize(int newsize){
    delete[] data;
    data = new T[newsize];
    size = newsize;
    for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
        init(data[i], size);
}

Recursive resizing works for higher dimensions, such as Array< Array< Array<int> > > q(3);

share|improve this question
    
You're probably calling delete[] on an uninitialized pointer. –  chris Jun 1 '13 at 19:25
    
At least you need make a plan how to pass the second dimension to the constructor. –  BlueWanderer Jun 1 '13 at 19:28
    
For what it's worth, your code doesn't crash on Ideone. –  djf Jun 1 '13 at 19:50
    
It doesn't crash in Visual Studio. Though you don't create second dimension. –  kotlomoy Jun 1 '13 at 20:12
    
I just ran this with g++ and it did not crash. It showed Array contructed, length = 0 three times.. –  lurker Jun 1 '13 at 20:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the code, you pasted, this should not crash. Did you forget the destructor? You should have a destructor that deletes the memory. When you have one, you need to make sure that data is initialized to nullptr (or NULL) so it does not crash when deleting an empty array.

But your approach is confusing. Is Array size supposed to be determined at runtime or at compile time? int b[3][3] is determined at compile time. If you want that, you should make the size a template argument like std::array in C++11, see http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/array

If you want to detemrine the size at runtime, you'll need a resize method to determine the size of the the 2nd dimension.

EDIT: Based on the driver code, you need to do something different in the constructor (passing the int to T if T is an Array). To be quite honest, this seems almost like a bug. This kind of specification makes it really hard to describe what the constructor do (call the default ctor for all types T except for Array)

I'd something like this:

private:
template <typename U>
void init(U&, int) {}

template <typename U>
void init(Array<U>& a, int sz)
{
    a.resize(sz);
}

public:
Array(int s) : size(s) {
    data = new T[size];
    for (int i = 0 ; i < size; ++i) {
        init(data[i], s);
    }
}

It works but this is ugly. If you can use C++11, you can something nicer with std::enable_if

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh yes thanks the cause of the segfault was an uninitialized pointer. Based on the driver code I think the size needs to be determined at runtime. A resize method sounds reasonable but I'm having trouble interfacing the container Array with the Array elements. I'm trying to check typeids of the template class with Array (in the constructor that takes an int) to see if they match and then build out the Arrays. This seems brute force and problematic, do you know of a better way? –  Cam Jun 1 '13 at 21:59
    
@CameronJuarez Add an T& operator[](int i) { return data[i]; }. Then use this to call resize() for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) { b[i].resize(3); } –  Guillaume Jun 1 '13 at 22:22
    
Right, I got that far but how am I going to distinguish an Array element from a non-Array element? e.g. b[i].resize(n) doesn't make sense if b is an Array of primitives. –  Cam Jun 1 '13 at 22:38
    
Do you mean recognize if it's T is an Array type in the Array() constructor? If so, it's possible but that does not seem like a good idea. I think you should edit the question with the driver code you're talking about so we understand better what you're trying to achieve –  Guillaume Jun 1 '13 at 22:47
    
Okay I updated with the driver code. But yeah what I mean is how will I implement the following: If T is an Array type, resize it to the correct size else do nothing. –  Cam Jun 1 '13 at 23:10

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