Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to render a profile user container that contains a list of labels and their associated values.

Here is an excerpt of information and layout I'd like to display:

First Name.......MyName

Age...................MyAge

email................MyEmail

I know that there are tons of examples available but the problem is that it seems that there is no commonly accepted solution.

So far I have seen the following usage :

  1. Table with markup (and < tr >,< td >...)
  2. Unordered list with < ul > markup (and < li >, < div >...)
  3. Regular markups with < h1 >,< h2 >...< p >
  4. Definition List with < DL >, < DT > and < DD >
  5. < label >...?

What is the most semantically correct? What is the easiest to display (in a 2-columns layout)? What do you advise me to use and for what reasons?

(html/css code snippets are more than welcomed)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Wow. We really have scared everyone off with the “Table layouts are evil! Use CSS!” stuff, haven't we?

A table — with <th> for the labels and <td> for the values — is perfectly applicable to this kind of content, gives you the rendering you want, and is at least as semantically correct as a definition list, arguably more so. Either are preferable to semantics-free divs.

share|improve this answer
1  
So true! Really, if your data is tabular, put it in a table. That's what they're for. –  dnagirl Nov 6 '09 at 15:08
2  
It could be argued that this isn't a table of data, but a list of labels and values. If there were more values then it would definitely be a table –  John Polling Nov 6 '09 at 15:33
    
In my situation, there is indeed more values. But I don't understand your comment. According to you, with few items, this is a list of labels/values but when the number of items is over a certain threshold, it becomes a table???? Do you limit your usage of unordered list (<ul>) according to the number of items? –  fabien7474 Nov 6 '09 at 15:48
    
I'll try to clear up the confusion. When there are more values...e.g. First Name.....MyName, AnotherName, etc (e.g. rows of data) then it is a table of data. The code above is clearly just a list of labels / values. –  John Polling Nov 6 '09 at 16:18
1  
@fabien. I think you have missed my point. I'm trying to say when a label has multiple values then you should be using a table. In this case where the label/value is a one-to-one relationship then really a dl is more appropriate. Even if the list was a 100 items long. –  John Polling Nov 7 '09 at 20:11

I think the most semantically correct would be <dl>, <dt> and <dd>, since what you're displaying are effectively definitions of first name, age and e-mail.

<dl>
  <dt>First Name</dt>
  <dd>Dominic</dd>
  <dt>Age</dt>
  <dd>24</dd>
  <dt>E-mail</dt>
  <dd>foo@bar.com</dd>
</dl>

However, obviously, the easiest way to display it in a table is using <table>, <th> and <td>. You could hack together a table-layout using definition lists using something like this:

dt { float: left; clear: left; width: 6em; font-weight: bold; }
dd { float: left; }

More info on the <dl> tag available here.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure that it is the most semantically correct? according to what I have been reading, <dl> is used for definition/description pairs (for glossary for instance) which is not the same as label/value pairs. –  fabien7474 Nov 6 '09 at 14:10
1  
I suppose it depends what your definition of "definition" is. For example, in the context of me, my first name is defined to be "Dominic". Whether you think that is a valid use of the word "define[d]" or not is somewhat subjective. –  Dominic Rodger Nov 6 '09 at 14:20
1  
According to the spec (w3.org/TR/html4/struct/lists.html#h-10.3), DL can be used to more than "definitions". The list type is intended for use as a list of key-value-pair (or multiple values) type of list. –  Arve Systad Nov 6 '09 at 14:33
    
This article (benmeadowcroft.com/webdev/articles/definition-lists.shtml) gives examples of <dl> usage using only terms/descriptions pairs. It says "definition lists are important because they provide a context for the text with which they are associated". Clearly, you define a term once and that's all. For instance, this is a genuine usage: <dt>CSS</dt> and <dd>Cascade Style Sheet</dd> because the value side of "CSS" is not supposed to change for each user contrary to the label "First Name" –  fabien7474 Nov 6 '09 at 14:49
2  
<dl> has been rebranded as a description list in the latest html5 spec. It seems to clarify that name / value pairs are appropriate. –  Eric Bock Apr 14 '11 at 13:52

I know this has been answered but I think definition lists can be perfectly appropriate.
I do agree with the bobince that tables are always appropriate for tabulated data...
However I have used this in a number of places where I preferred to avoid tables - and I don't think it is an incorrect method.

Definition lists:

<dl>
  <dt>Label</dt>
  <dd>Value</dd>

  <dt>Label 2</dt>
  <dd>Value 2</dd>
</dl>

With the CSS:

dt dt {
  float: left;
  width: 200px;
  text-align: right;
}

dt dd {
  margin-left: 215px;
}
share|improve this answer

This is a good question and is also one that is open to much debate becasue there is no fixed way of doing this.

there are arguments for many of them but me personally, I would keep it simple.

<div class="profile">
    <p>
        <span class="label">First Name</span>
        <span class="value">MyName</span>
    </p>
    <p>
        <span class="label">Age </span>
        <span class="value">MyAge</span>
    </p>
    <p>
        <span class="label">Email</span>
        <span class="value">MyEmail</span>
    </p>
</div>

or

<ul class="profile">
    <li>
        <span class="label">First Name</span>
        <span class="value">MyName</span>
    </li>
    <li>
        <span class="label">Age </span>
        <span class="value">MyAge</span>
    </li>
    <li>
        <span class="label">Email</span>
        <span class="value">MyEmail</span>
    </li>
</ul>

CSS would look something like this;

.profile p {
    overflow: hidden;
}

.profile .label {
    vertical-align: top;
    float: left;
    width: 40%;
}

.profile .value{
    vertical-align: top;
    float: left;
    width: 60%;
}

the reason for not referencing any specific html Node name in the CSS is that if in the future there is a recognised way of doing this you only have to change node names in your HTML.

share|improve this answer
    
A bad solution in my opinion. You never define anywhere - semantically - that the labels are labels, which are connected to the values. For anything else than a normal web browser (screen readers, mobile devices etc) the text in each paragraph would just look like "First Name Myname", "Age Myage" etc. - which is just not very readable. –  Arve Systad Nov 6 '09 at 14:30
    
Try to avoid using the p tag for things that aren't really paragraphs. –  Mike Crittenden Nov 6 '09 at 15:09
    
This isn't semantically correct. P tags are for paragraphs and there is no definition of what is a label and what is a value –  John Polling Nov 6 '09 at 15:32
    
Maybe it is not the correct answer. However it is a widespread usage AND it should not be downvoted ! Downvote is usually ofr answers that are out-of-scope or totally wrong ! –  fabien7474 Nov 6 '09 at 15:44
    
Widespead usage does not make answers correct. A while ago table based layout had widespread usage, that didn't make it correct. I'm sorry, but this markup is totally wrong. –  John Polling Nov 6 '09 at 15:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.