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I've recently started looking into the topic of image processing. I figured one of the first things I should do is learn how images work. My latest project involves making a new copy of an image. I wanted to do it as fast as possible, so I tried to come up with as many approaches as I could. I wrote a method for each approach, then timed how long it took to call the method 100 times. These are my results:

Marshal:    0.45584
Instance:   1.69299
Clone:      0.30687
GetSet:   341.74056
Pointer:    2.54130
Graphics:   1.07960

Each method is passed a source image and destination image. The end goal is to copy all the pixels from the first image into the second image.

private void MarshalCopyMethod(Bitmap sourceImage, Bitmap destinationImage)
{
    // Lock the bitmap's bits.
    Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(0, 0, sourceImage.Width, sourceImage.Height);
    BitmapData readData = sourceImage.LockBits(rect, ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, sourceImage.PixelFormat);
    BitmapData writeData = destinationImage.LockBits(rect, ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, sourceImage.PixelFormat);

    // Get the address of the first line.
    IntPtr sourcePtr = readData.Scan0;
    IntPtr destinationPtr = writeData.Scan0;
    byte[] rgbValues = new byte[readData.Stride * readData.Height];

    Marshal.Copy(sourcePtr, rgbValues, 0, rgbValues.Length);
    Marshal.Copy(rgbValues, 0, destinationPtr, rgbValues.Length);

    sourceImage.UnlockBits(readData);
    destinationImage.UnlockBits(writeData);
}
private void PointerCopyMethod(Bitmap sourceImage, Bitmap destinationImage)
{
    // Lock the bitmap's bits.
    Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(0, 0, sourceImage.Width, sourceImage.Height);
    BitmapData readData = sourceImage.LockBits(rect, ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, sourceImage.PixelFormat);
    BitmapData writeData = destinationImage.LockBits(rect, ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, sourceImage.PixelFormat);
    unsafe
    {
        // Get the address of the first line.
        byte* readPointer = (byte*)readData.Scan0.ToPointer();
        byte* writePointer = (byte*)writeData.Scan0.ToPointer();

        int lengthOfData = readData.Stride * readData.Height;
        for (int i = 0; i < lengthOfData; i++)
        {
            *writePointer++ = *readPointer++;
        }
    }
    sourceImage.UnlockBits(readData);
    destinationImage.UnlockBits(writeData);
}
private void InstanceCopyMethod(Bitmap sourceImage, Bitmap destinationImage)
{
    destinationImage = new Bitmap(sourceImage);
}
private void CloneRegionMethod(Bitmap sourceImage, Bitmap destinationImage)
{
    destinationImage = sourceImage.Clone(new Rectangle(860, 440, 200, 200), sourceImage.PixelFormat);
}
private void CloneCopyMethod(Bitmap sourceImage, Bitmap destinationImage)
{
    destinationImage = (Bitmap)sourceImage.Clone();
}
private void GetSetPixelCopyMethod(Bitmap sourceImage, Bitmap destinationImage)
{
    for (int y = 0; y < sourceImage.Height; y++)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < sourceImage.Width; x++)
        {
            destinationImage.SetPixel(x, y, destinationImage.GetPixel(x, y));
        }
    }
}
private void GraphicsCopyMethod(Bitmap sourceImage, Bitmap destinationImage)
{
    using(Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(destinationImage))
    {
        g.DrawImage(sourceImage, new Point(0, 0));
    }
}

The following two lines are also added to the end of every method:

destinationImage.SetPixel(955, 535, Color.Red);
destinationImage.SetPixel(965, 545, Color.Green);

I did this because of something I read about Image.Clone(). It was something to the effect that a copy was not actually created until you modified a portion of the clone. Without setting these pixels, the Clone() approach seems to finish like 1000 times faster. I'm not quite sure what exactly is going on there.

The results seem to be about what I'd expect from what I've been reading online. However, the pointer approach is the slowest one I implemented outside the Get/Set Pixel methods. From my personal studies, I expected pointers to be one of the fastest, if not the fastest.

I've got a couple questions related to my project. Am I using pointers optimally for this situation? Why would the cloning approach be affected by changing a pixel in the clone image? Is there another approach that can copy an image in a shorter amount of time? Any other advice/tips? Thanks.

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Clone() doesn't actually copy the pixels so it is fastest. Pointer and GetSet copy with your code instead of the hand-tuned native code inside GDI+ so they are slowest. –  Hans Passant Jun 1 '13 at 22:42

1 Answer 1

Numbers look reasonable. Summary:

  • GetPixel/SetPixel are slow
  • specially written code is faster
  • writing fast version of memcpy is very hard, beating library version is almost impossible in general case for any language (one can expect to get better performance in special cases like specific size/target CPU).

If you want to play more with pointers - try and measure: - try the same code in regular C# (indexes) - try to switch to int for copying - notice that each row is DWORD aligned - no need to special case for tail. - re-implement block copy from marshaling sample

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