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I am teaching my son C++ and he wanted to look at new C++ 11 features. I compiled gcc 4.8 as g++-4.8

$ gcc-4.8
gcc-4.8: fatal error: no input files
compilation terminated.

Running a simple example fails with:

$ g++-4.8 -Wall main.cpp Jason.h Jason.cpp -o jason
main.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
main.cpp:15:2: error: ‘Jason::Jason’ names the constructor, not the type
  Jason::Jason j1 = new Jason::Jason();
  ^
main.cpp:15:15: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘j1’
  Jason::Jason j1 = new Jason::Jason();
           ^
main.cpp:15:38: error: statement cannot resolve address of overloaded function
  Jason::Jason j1 = new Jason::Jason();
                                  ^
main.cpp:17:2: error: ‘j1’ was not declared in this scope
  j1.sayHi("Howdy");
  ^
Jason.cpp:12:19: error: expected initializer before ‘sayHi’
 void Jason::Jason sayHi(sd::string s)

I did: g++-4.8 -Wall main.cpp Jason.h Jason.cpp -o jason

main.cpp:

#include "Jason.h"

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Hi" << std::endl;

    std::string s = "testing";

    std::cout << "s: " << s.c_str() << std::endl;

    Jason::Jason j1 = Jason::Jason();

    j1.sayHi("Howdy");

    return 0;
}

Jason.h:

#ifndef __JASON_H__
#define __JASON_H__

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class Jason
{
    public:
        Jason();
    virtual ~Jason();

        void sayHi(std::string s);

    protected:
        std::string hi; 

};
#endif

Jason.cpp:

#include "Jason.h"

Jason::Jason()
{
    hi = "Hello";

    std::cout << "You said Hi like: " << hi.c_str() << std::endl;   
}

void Jason::Jason sayHi(sd::string s)
{
    std::cout << "You also said hi by: " << s.c_str() << std::end;
}

I took a step back and tried with the system default gcc:

$ g++
i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-g++-4.2: no input files

$ g++ -Wall main.cpp Jason.h Jason.cpp -o jason

But I still get a single error:

Jason.cpp:12: error: expected initializer before ‘sayHi’

Can anyone help me understand why this is failing?

I tried a simple C++v11 example:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

//This function will be called from a thread
void call_from_thread() {
   std::cout << "Hello, World!" << std::endl;
}

int main() {
   //Launch a thread
   std::thread t1(call_from_thread);

    //Join the thread with the main thread
    t1.join();

    return 0;
}

Compiling..

$ g++-4.8 -Wall main2.cpp  -o test -std=c++11
$ ./test
Hello, World!
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closed as off-topic by Quuxplusone, lpapp, Jim Garrison, Soner Gönül, nalply Feb 11 '14 at 7:04

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Quuxplusone, lpapp, Jim Garrison, Soner Gönül, nalply
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You're using a reserved identifier. As for the difference, stackoverflow.com/questions/12135498/…. You can also print std::strings directly, no need for c_str. –  chris Jun 1 '13 at 22:40
    
can you point out the reserved identifier. Also, I have this habit of using c_str() a lot and I am not sure why. But I always do. Is that a bad habit? reason? –  Jason Jun 1 '13 at 22:44
    
You also have a ytpo in there: sd::string s should be std::string s. –  Paul R Jun 1 '13 at 22:45
1  
Your reserved identifier is __JASON_H__. And c_str has its uses, but it's just extra code for no benefit here. Unless you really need a C string, why bother converting it? –  chris Jun 1 '13 at 22:46
    
is it the "__"? –  Jason Jun 1 '13 at 22:49

1 Answer 1

Multiple reasons, lots of minor typos in there;

void Jason::Jason sayHi(sd::string s)

should be

void Jason::sayHi(std::string s)

...and...

std::cout << "You also said hi by: " << s.c_str() << std::end;

...should be...

std::cout << "You also said hi by: " << s.c_str() << std::endl;

...and...

virtual ~Jason();

...is declared, but not implemented

...and...

Jason::Jason j1 = Jason::Jason();

while it apparently compiles, can be simplified to (thanks chris)

Jason j1;

That should get you started, I don't have a C++ compiler to test with so may not be all :)

share|improve this answer
    
About the last part, neither of those are preferable, especially not the second, to Jason j1;. –  chris Jun 1 '13 at 22:48
    
@chris True, but the former should compile and run ok unless I'm missing something. The latter would require changing the usage to pointer usage. Adding your comment either way, it is indeed the better way. –  Joachim Isaksson Jun 1 '13 at 22:51
    
It should work, it's just extra typing, requires an accessible copy constructor, and theoretically, creates one and then copies it :) –  chris Jun 1 '13 at 22:56
    
Why is Jason:Jason j1 = Jason::Jason(); wrong? Jason is a class, but if I did: int i; Jason::something(i); that would work –  Jason Jun 1 '13 at 22:59
    
so why does it work? I am even looking at an example that makes this call in the same way... –  Jason Jun 1 '13 at 23:04

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