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Using

binary= parseInt(hex,16).toString(2)

as a way to convert a hex number to binary in js is breaking with extremely large values.

for example, 0xb5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48b5af48 as the hex input will produce

101101011010111101001000101101011010111101001000101110000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

which is obviously an incorrect response given

10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000 10110101 10101111 01001000

would be the correct response.

I have a feeling this is related to how js handles really big numbers but am not sure how to deal with this. Any help is greatly appreciated. It is truly strange to strange to find AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA as the end result of a base64 converter.

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I'm guessing javascript number precision is to blame. Try running Math.floor(.99999999999999999999999999999999999) and see what that gets you. –  adeneo Jun 1 '13 at 23:17
    
It outputs one. That's a bit disappointing, I thought it would handle large numbers better than small. Have any ideas on how I might get around this limit? –  Everlag Jun 1 '13 at 23:20
    
You'd have to get library that kept the numbers as strings (or some other non-number). A quick google search found cjandia.com/2012/06/x-calc/libs/bigint.js.txt although I did not see hex conversion in there (easy to write). –  DrC Jun 1 '13 at 23:27
    
I don't suppose there would be a way to do this just in native js? –  Everlag Jun 1 '13 at 23:32
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1 Answer

The parseInt call is resulting in a JS integer which is really just a float and, as such, has a limited accuracy. So the parseInt gives 3.529532211233421e+86. Your toString(2) starts with that value and has further compromises from there.

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Curious, I guess assuming accuracy is a bad idea! Have any ideas on how to get around this to get the correct binary output? –  Everlag Jun 1 '13 at 23:27
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